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No. 98-483C (Judge Baskir) ______________________________________________________________________________ IN THE UNITED STATES COURT OF FEDERAL CLAIMS FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY, Plaintiff, v. THE UNITED STATES, Defendant. ______________________________________________________________________________ DEFENDANT'S MOTION TO COORDINATE DISCOVERY AND DEVELOP A LITIGATION PLAN FOR THE SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL CASES ______________________________________________________________________________ OF COUNSEL: JANE K. TAYLOR Office of General Counsel U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585 ALAN J. LO RE Senior Trial Counsel MARIANA T. ACEVEDO JOSEPH E. ASHMAN ANDREW P. AVERBACH PATRICK B. BRYAN CHRISTOPHER J. CARNEY LISA M. DONAHUE SCOTT R. DAMELIN STEPHEN P. FINN JEREMIAH M. LUONGO ANTHONY W. MOSES SONIA M. ORFIELD SCOTT C. SLATER SHARON SNYDER Trial Attorneys Commercial Litigation Branch U.S. Department of Justice August 21, 2008 GREGORY G. KATSAS Assistant Attorney General JEANNE E. DAVIDSON Director HAROLD D. LESTER, JR. Assistant Director MARIAN E. SULLIVAN Senior Trial Counsel Commercial Litigation Branch U.S. Department of Justice Attn: Classification Unit, 8th Floor 1100 L Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20530 Tele: (202) 307-0365 Fax: (202) 307-2503

Attorneys for Defendant

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TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE TABLE OF AUTHORITIES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii SUMMARY OF ARGUMENT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 BACKGROUND. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 I. II. NATURE AND GENESIS OF THE SNF LITIGATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 STATUS OF THE SNF LITIGATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 A. B. III. Proceedings Before This Court. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Appellate Proceedings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

COURSE OF DISCOVERY AND THE PRESSING NEED FOR COORDINATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 THE GOVERNMENT'S CONSISTENT REQUESTS FOR COORDINATED DISCOVERY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

IV.

ARGUMENT.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 I. THE COURT HAS AUTHORITY TO DIRECT THE COORDINATION OF DISCOVERY AND LITIGATION ON A CASE-WIDE BASIS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 THE COURT SHOULD INSTITUTE COORDINATED DISCOVERY PROCEEDINGS IN THE SNF CASES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 IN CONJUNCTION WITH COORDINATED DISCOVERY, THE COURT SHOULD IMPOSE A LITIGATION PLAN THAT WOULD RESULT IN RESOLUTION OF THE REMAINING SNF CASES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

II.

III.

CONCLUSION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

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TABLE OF AUTHORITIES CASES PAGE(S)

Boston Edison Co. v. United States, 80 Fed. Cl. 468 (2008), appeal docketed, No. 08-5066 (Fed. Cir. April 17, 2008). .......... 8, 11 California Fed. Bank v. United States, 39 Fed. Cl. 753 (1997). .......................................................................................................... 19 Carolina Power & Light Co. v. United States, 82 Fed. Cl. 23 (2008). .............................................................................................................. 8 Christopher Village, LP v. United States, 50 Fed. Cl. 635 (2001). .......................................................................................................... 20 Commonwealth Edison Co. v. United States, 56 Fed. Cl. 652 (2003). .......................................................................................................... 12 Dairyland Power Coop. v. United States, 77 Fed. Cl. 330 (2007). .......................................................................................................... 15 First Fed. Sav. Bank of Hegewisch v. United States, 63 Fed. Cl. 790 (2005). .......................................................................................................... 19 Indiana Michigan Power Co. v. United States, 57 Fed. Cl. 88 (2003). ............................................................................................................ 12 Indiana Michigan Power Co. v. United States, 60 Fed. Cl. 639 (2004), aff'd, 422 F.3d 1369 (Fed. Cir. 2005). ........................................... 3, 8 Northern States Power Co. v. United States, 78 Fed. Cl. 449 (2007), appeal docketed, No. 08-5037 (Fed. Cir. Feb. 11, 2008). ................. 8 Northern States Power Co. v. United States Department of Energy, 128 F.3d 754 (D.C. Cir. 1997). ................................................................................................ 9 Pacific Gas & Elec. Co. v. United States, 73 Fed. Cl. 333 (2006), appeal docketed, No. 07-5046 (Fed. Cir. Jan. 24, 2007). .......... 4, 8, 9 Suerr v. United States, 2008 WL 3089952 (Fed. Cir. Aug. 7, 2008)............................................................... 19, 20 Southern Nuclear Operating Co. v. United States, 77 Fed. Cl. 396 (2007), appeal docketed, No. 08-5020 (Fed. Cir. Jan. 3, 2008). .................... 8 -ii-

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TABLE OF AUTHORITIES (CONT'D) CASES PAGE(S)

System Fuels, Inc. v. United States, 79 Fed. Cl. 37 (2007), appeal docketed, No. 08-5025 (Fed. Cir. Jan. 9, 2008). ...................... 8 Tennessee Valley Auth. v. United States, 69 Fed. Cl. 515 (2005). ............................................................................................................ 8 Yankee Atomic Elec. Co. v. United States, 54 Fed. Cl. 306 (2002). .......................................................................................................... 15 Yankee Atomic Elec. Co. v. United States, 2008 WL 3089032 (Fed. Cir. Aug. 7, 2008)............................................................................ 6

STATUTES AND RULES 10 C.F.R. 961.11. ............................................................................................................... passim 42 U.S.C. 10101-10270 (1994)................................................................................................. 5 RCFC 40.2, Cmt. Note 2002 Revision . ........................................................................... 17, 18, 19 RCFC 42. ...................................................................................................................................... 18

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INDEX TO APPENDIX DOCUMENT PAGE

Excerpts of Transcript of Status Conference, Spent Nuclear Fuel Discovery v. United States (April 30, 2004). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A 1 Excerpts of Status Report Regarding "Pre-Discovery Conference," Niagara Mohawk Power Corp. v. United States (May 7, 2004). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A 12 Excerpts of Deposition of Robert L. Morgan, Yankee Atomic Electric Co., et. al. v. United States (March 21, 2002). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A 21 Excerpts of Deposition of Robert L. Morgan, Northern States Power Co. v. United States (November 15, 2006). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A 31 Letter from G. Smith to Hon. E. J. Damich with attached Report of the Ad Hoc Committee on Related Cases of the CFC Advisory Council (May 27, 2008).. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A 38

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IN THE UNITED STATES COURT OF FEDERAL CLAIMS FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY, Plaintiff, v. THE UNITED STATES, Defendant. ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) )

No. 98-483C (Judge Baskir)

DEFENDANT'S MOTION TO COORDINATE DISCOVERY AND DEVELOP A LITIGATION PLAN FOR THE SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL CASES Pursuant to Rules 1, 40.1, 40.2, and 42 of the Rules of the Court of Federal Claims ("RCFC"), and consistent with the recent recommendation of the Advisory Council regarding the manner in which this Court should approach related cases, defendant, the United States, respectfully requests that this Court assign a panel of three Judges to consider and issue a case management order for all cases involving claims for partial breach of the Standard Contract for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel or High-Level Radioactive Waste, 10 C.F.R. 961.11 ("Standard Contract"), by the United States Department of Energy1 ("DOE"), including the establishment of a litigation plan for resolving the remaining spent nuclear fuel ("SNF") cases pending before this Court.

Pursuant to RCFC 40.2, a party may file notice of "directly-related" or "indirectlyrelated" cases captioned in the name of the earliest-filed case. Florida Power & Light Co. v. United States, No. 98-483C (Fed. Cl.), is the earliest spent nuclear fuel case pending before the Court. Because RCFC 40.2(a) directs that notice of directly-related cases be filed in "all related cases," we are filing this motion, which bears the Florida Power caption, in all of the pending spent nuclear fuel cases. The pending cases to which this motion is applicable are identified in Attachment A.

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SUMMARY OF ARGUMENT As the Court is aware, the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit recently issued decisions in several appeals which involve issues that are essential to the Court's evaluation of causation and damages issues in all of the SNF cases that remain pending before this Court. In addition, one remaining appeal is expected to address the issue of whether the Government may invoke the "Unavoidable Delays" clause of the Standard Contract as a defense against liability in all of these cases. Numerous cases before this Court have been stayed pending the resolution of these appellate cases. Presumably, when the decisions become final (following the resolution of any petitions for rehearing or other requests for further review), the rationale underlying the existing stays in many, if not all, of the cases that remain pending before this Court will dissipate. In anticipation of the additional demands upon the Court's resources, we respectfully request that the Court take this opportunity to create a litigation and discovery plan for the development and resolution of the remaining SNF cases so that, once the appropriate appellate guidance is final, the parties are in a position efficiently and effectively to take action to resolve these remaining SNF cases. Recently, by letter dated May 27, 2008, the United States Court of Federal Claims Advisory Council forwarded to the Chief Judge the Report of the Ad Hoc Committee on Related Cases. A. 38-48.2 In that report, which the Advisory Council approved on May 21, 2008, the Committee, by unanimous vote, recommended that the Chief Judge designate a standing panel of three Judges, one of which will be assigned as the Presiding Officer of the panel, to resolve issues and develop litigation plans for related cases. The panel of three Judges would have the
2

"A. __" refers to the appendix to this motion. -2-

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authority to transfer cases, consolidate cases, adopt coordinated discovery schedules, or take other action that the panel determines is the most efficient means of developing the related cases. Consistent with the Advisory Committee's recommendation, the United States respectfully requests that the Court create a panel of three Judges of this Court to consider this case management request. We further request that the three-Judge panel institute a case management plan coordinating the resolution of the remaining cases and discovery and through which all further discovery issues arising in the remaining SNF cases still pending before the Court would be resolved. In addition, the United States requests that the Court automatically include all future SNF cases in this litigation plan.3 As explained below, this Court is authorized to direct the coordination of case management and discovery in the SNF litigation. Moreover, the Court has a proven record of successfully coordinating case management and discovery in complex litigation involving multiple cases. Of particular precedential significance to this case, the Court in the Winstar litigation devised a plan for the coordination of discovery in more than 120 cases. The implementation of a similar coordinated discovery plan in the SNF cases would prevent the parties' duplicative and redundant discovery efforts and, thereby, avoid the unnecessary costs and delay associated with the current discovery scheme. Further, coordination of discovery will

To date, five utility plaintiffs have filed new complaints seeking to recover damages incurred since the cutoff for damages from their first suit. Northern States Power Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. No. 07-608C; Yankee Atomic Electric Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. No. 07-876; Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. No. 07-875; Maine Yankee Atomic Power Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. No. 07-877; and, Alabama Power Co., et. al, v. United States, Fed. Cl. No. 08-237C. Pursuant to the Federal Circuit's guidance in Indiana Michigan Power Co. v. United States, 422 F.3d 1369 (Fed. Cir. 2005), the Government expects that all utility plaintiffs will continue to file suits until DOE begins performance. -3-

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promote consistency in the Court's discovery rulings. Without coordinated case management and discovery, the Court and parties in particular, the Government will continue to be over burdened by the lack of an organized process. As part of this litigation plan, we respectfully request the three-Judge panel to order that, once the Federal Circuit issues final decisions in the recently argued appeals,4 all remaining SNF plaintiffs will be required to provide the Government with detailed damages claims and take any further necessary discovery from the Government within a specified time frame. As the Court is aware, several DOE witnesses have been required to sit for a multitude of depositions, each time being asked similar questions about DOE's program for disposal of commercial nuclear utility SNF. In addition, various plaintiffs' counsel in different SNF cases have been able to make duplicative requests for discovery and document production from different Judges of this Court, creating for themselves multiple opportunities to attempt to obtain the same documents and discovery from the Court. In several instances, after being denied an overbroad discovery scope by one or more Judges in a particular area, another Judge will then grant that discovery, effectively allowing all plaintiffs access to that previously-denied area of discovery. By creating a single coordinated discovery plan, the Court will be able to control costs, deter Judge-shopping, and expedite resolution of the remaining SNF cases. Further, the Court will be better able to

Specifically, the Federal Circuit has provided guidance in resolving causation and damages issues in the remaining SNF cases in decisions in the following appeals: Yankee Atomic Electric Co. v. United States, Nos. 07-5025, -5026, -5027, -5031, -5032, -5033 (Fed. Cir.); Pacific Gas & Electric Co. v. United States, No. 07-5046 (Fed. Cir.); and Sacramento Municipal Utility District v. United States, Nos. 07-5052, -5097 (Fed. Cir.). In addition, the Federal Circuit's decision in Nebraska Public Power District v. United States, No. 07-5083 (Fed. Cir.), will likely provide guidance regarding the United States' ability to raise the "unavoidable delays" clause as a defense in the SNF cases. -4-

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coordinate discovery by the Government from the various plaintiffs in different SNF cases to minimize costs both to the Government and to the plaintiffs. BACKGROUND I. NATURE AND GENESIS OF THE SNF LITIGATION The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, 42 U.S.C. 10101-10270 (1994) ("NWPA"), authorized the Secretary of Energy to enter into contracts with commercial nuclear power utilities and other entities through which DOE would accept and dispose of the contract holders' SNF in return for their payment of fees into the Nuclear Waste Fund. Ultimately, DOE entered into approximately 76 such contracts, all of which mirrored the Standard Contract set forth at 10 C.F.R. 961.11.5 While the Standard Contract called for DOE to "begin" SNF acceptance "not later than January 31, 1998," 10 C.F.R. 961.11, Art. II, the contract contained no rate or schedule governing DOE's acceptance of SNF. Rather, it entitled DOE to establish the rate of acceptance by identifying the total amount of SNF that it would receive annually during the contract's performance. See 10 C.F.R. 961.11, Arts. IV.B & V. Once DOE settled upon the rate, DOE and the individual contract holders were to determine which of the entities would receive allocations in specific years, thereby prescribing the contractual schedule of acceptance. This schedule applied equally to all contract holders, allocating to each an amount of SNF acceptance based upon the program-wide acceptance amount for a given year and the sums to be accepted from other contract holders.6

Consolidation in the nuclear industry and corresponding assignments of Standard Contract rights has reduced the number of entities currently holding such contracts to 32. The operation of two other contractual provisions also affected DOE's schedule of acceptance. The first of these provided contract holders a right to "exchange" with others their -56

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The enormous complexities associated with developing and commissioning a facility for the storage or disposal of SNF, including certain statutory restrictions upon DOE's ability to accept SNF and funding limitations that Congress imposed upon the program, prevented DOE from commencing acceptance under the Standard Contract in 1998. DOE currently anticipates that it will be unable to begin contractual performance until at least 2020. In the meantime, contract holders and their assignees have filed numerous lawsuits seeking billions of dollars in damages for DOE's alleged "partial" breach of the Standard Contract, with many of these entities also pursuing takings claims under the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution. All of the SNF cases before this Court turn on common issues of fact and law. As the Federal Circuit recently held in Yankee Atomic Electric Co. v. United States, 2008 WL 3089032 (Fed. Cir. Aug. 7, 2008), key to the resolution of each matter is a determination of the parties' obligations under the Standard Contract, including their intent and understanding of contractual rights and duties. Throughout the SNF litigation, the question of what rate of acceptance was envisioned by the Standard Contract has emerged as a central issue for the Court's consideration in analyzing causation and damages. The Court also has struggled to resolve whether the Standard Contract obligated DOE to accept Greater-than-Class C radioactive waste ("GTCC"), the interplay between the contractually mandated oldest-fuel-first provision and the separate clause providing for exchanges, and the ramifications of potential interim storage of SNF. In many cases, it has also faced arguments regarding prejudgment interest recovery, the enforceability of assignments of claims and contracts, and the effect of a party's non-payment of

approved delivery commitment schedules, while the second governed "priority acceptance" for shut-down reactors. See 10 C.F.R. 961.11, Arts. V.E., IV.B(1)(b). -6-

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a mandatory one-time fee. Discovery in these cases has focused repeatedly on these and other recurring themes. Plaintiffs have expressly recognized the pervasive commonality of this litigation by filing substantively similar complaints which in some instances are virtually identical but have generally opposed the consolidation or coordination of these cases. The decisions recently issued by the Federal Circuit, while not yet final, provide guidance on the rate of acceptance to be applied by the Court as well as regarding whether the Standard Contract requires acceptance of GTCC waste, whether the Government may recoup the one-time fee from any damages award, and whether theories regarding exchanges of SNF acceptance allocations constitute a viable basis for increasing damages awards. Future appeals are expected to decide other issues common to these cases. Given the demonstrated commonality among these cases, the Court is now in a position to ensure that the remaining SNF are resolved through an organized process. II. STATUS OF THE SNF LITIGATION A. Proceedings Before This Court

To date, private sector utility companies have filed 71 cases arising from DOE's delay in accepting SNF pursuant to the Standard Contract. Of these, 18 cases have proceeded to trial, seven have settled, and three were withdrawn. The Court has issued final decisions in 15 of the

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SNF cases to have been tried.7 Presently, 46 cases remain pending before the Court. Of these, ten are in active litigation and four are scheduled for trial before the end of 2009. One of the reasons discovery has not gone forward in all of the SNF cases is that many of them were stayed shortly after they were filed. Typically, the implementation of such stays followed agreement by plaintiffs and the Government to proceed at a future point, when certain SNF issues had been clarified by this Court and/or the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. Currently, 27 of the SNF cases are stayed. The Court, however, recently lifted the stays in two SNF cases where the plaintiffs in those cases, despite the lack of Federal Circuit guidance, decided that they wanted actively to pursue their claims.8 Further, once the Federal Circuit decisions concerning the pending SNF issues become final, the rationale for many, if not all, of the remaining stays will dissipate. Absent the adoption of a case management plan, many of the SNF cases likely will proceed through discovery on roughly parallel schedules in the near future.

See Indiana Michigan Power Co. v. United States, 60 Fed. Cl. 639 (2004), aff'd, 422 F.3d 1369 (Fed. Cir. 2005); Yankee Atomic Elec. Co. v. United States, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Co. v. United States, and Maine Yankee Atomic Power Co. v. United States, 73 Fed. Cl. 229 (2006), appeals docketed, Nos. 07-5025, 07-5027 & 07-5026 (Fed. Cir. Dec. 2006); Tennessee Valley Auth. v. United States, 69 Fed. Cl. 515 (2005); Pacific Gas & Elec. Co. v. United States, 73 Fed. Cl. 333 (2006), appeal docketed, No. 07-5046 (Fed. Cir. Jan. 24, 2007); Sacramento Mun. Util. Dist. v. United States, 74 Fed. Cl. 727 (2006), appeal docketed, No. 075052 (Fed. Cir. Feb. 6, 2007); Southern Nuclear Operating Co. v. United States, 77 Fed. Cl. 396 (2007), appeal docketed, No. 08-5020 (Fed. Cir. Jan. 3, 2008); System Fuels, Inc. v. United States, 79 Fed. Cl. 37 (2007), appeal docketed, No. 08-5025 (Fed. Cir. Jan. 9, 2008); Northern States Power Co. v. United States, 78 Fed. Cl. 449 (2007), appeal docketed, No. 08-5037 (Fed. Cir. Feb. 11, 2008); Boston Edison Co. v. United States, 80 Fed. Cl. 468 (2008), appeal docketed, No. 08-5066 (Fed. Cir. April 17, 2008); Carolina Power & Light Co. v. United States, 82 Fed. Cl. 23 (2008), appeal filed (Fed. Cir. Aug. 15, 2008). This Court recently lifted stays of proceedings in PSEG Nuclear, L.L.C. v. United States, No. 01-551 (Fed. Cl.), and Detroit Edison Co. v. United States, No. 02-926 (Fed. Cl.). -88

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B.

Appellate Proceedings

The Federal Circuit recently issued decisions in Yankee Atomic Electric Co. v. United States, Nos. 07-5025, -5026, -5027, -5031, -5032, -5033 (Fed. Cir.); Pacific Gas & Electric Co. v. United States, No. 07-5046 (Fed. Cir.); and Sacramento Municipal Utility District v. United States, Nos. 07-5052, -5097 (Fed. Cir.). In each of these decisions, the Federal Circuit made determinations regarding the appropriate SNF acceptance rate to apply for purposes of evaluating causation and damages in these cases. In addition, the appellate court decided issues relating to whether GTCC waste is covered by the Standard Contract, whether plaintiffs can rely upon a theory of "exchanges" of SNF acceptance allocations as affecting causation and damages analyses, and whether the United States is entitled to recoup unpaid one-time fees from damages awards. As we have seen in other SNF cases, regardless of the manner in which the appellate court finally resolves these issues, there will likely be additional efforts to take additional discovery upon these and other topics that, in other SNF cases, have previously been thoroughly subjected to extensive discovery. Another case, Nebraska Public Power District v. United States, No. 07-5083 (Fed. Cir.), remains pending on appeal.9 This appeal involves the issue of whether the Government may invoke the "Unavoidable Delays" clause of the Standard Contract as a defense against liability in the SNF cases. Currently, a writ of mandamus that the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit issued in Northern States Power Co. v. United States Department of

There are pending appeals in six other cases at the Federal Circuit. The briefing on four of these appeals has been stayed pending the outcome of the appeals noted above. Once the recent decisions of the Federal Circuit become final, the Government will have to determine which of these appeals should be remanded in light of the Federal Circuit's guidance. -9-

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Energy, 128 F.3d 754 (D.C. Cir. 1997), precludes the Government from invoking this defense, but this Court in Nebraska Public Power found the District of Columbia Circuit's writ to be void. Should the Federal Circuit hold in the appeal of that interlocutory decision that the Government may raise the defense, the SNF plaintiffs could seek a significant amount of discovery from the Government regarding that issue, and that discovery would likely be highly duplicative in each of the SNF cases. Because the District of Columbia Circuit has previously barred the Government from raising the "unavoidable delays" defense, there has been no discovery to date regarding that issue. III. COURSE OF DISCOVERY AND THE PRESSING NEED FOR COORDINATION On January 8, 2001, the Government sought to consolidate before a single Judge all of the 14 then-pending SNF cases. See The United States' Motion To The Chief Judge To Reassign To A Single Judge Cases Involving Alleged Breaches Of The Standard Contract Published At 10 C.F.R. Part 961. Initially, the Court deferred ruling upon the Government's motion and, instead, directed the parties to engage in coordinated discovery proceedings. On July 10, 2001, the plaintiffs and the Government moved jointly regarding the scope and procedures to be employed in the coordinated discovery proceedings. The parties agreed that these proceedings would concern "schedule issues," including "the order, pace, and rate of acceptance of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste pursuant to the Standard Contract, any priority for shutdown reactors, exchanges of acceptance slots, and the Government's obligation to accept and time of acceptance of Greater-Than-Class C radioactive waste." On September 26, 2001, the Court entered a stipulated order memorializing this agreement.

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A Discovery Judge initially presided over the coordinated discovery proceedings and resolved various discovery disputes between the parties. By order dated February 1, 2002, the Court permitted plaintiffs to take 10 depositions to defend against the Government's pending motions for partial summary judgment regarding the rate of acceptance and GTCC. By order dated March 25, 2002, the Court granted the utility plaintiffs' request not to include in their allotment of ten depositions any RCFC 30(b)(6) depositions, but cautioned that "future depositions will be permitted only upon showing that (1) the information sought from the additional deponents is critical to responding to the pending dispositive motions, and (2) such information could not have been obtained in prior depositions or through other methods of discovery." In response to plaintiffs' requests for production, the Government produced 795,834 pages of documents through the coordinated discovery period. The Government also made 10 fact witnesses available for deposition, and three additional witnesses testified on behalf of the Government in five separate Rule 30(b)(6) depositions addressed to 10 core SNF topics. These coordinated discovery depositions occupied 34 days between February 19, 2002, and May 21, 2002.10

In recent filings in Boston Edison Co. v. United States, No. 99-447C (Fed. Cl.), and Dairyland Power Coop. v. United States, No. 04-0106C (Fed. Cl.), plaintiffs cited to the Court's February 1, 2002 order as evidence that the scope of coordinated discovery was unnecessarily or improperly limited. This is not the case. Although the Court's order facially limited discovery to issues associated with the Government's pending motions for partial summary judgment, those motions concerned the same issues identified in the parties' original joint motion for coordinated discovery proceedings (including order, pace, and rate of SNF acceptance, and the Government's obligations with respect to GTCC). Moreover, the Government designated witnesses to testify on all 10 RCFC 30(b)(6) topics identified by the plaintiffs, although some of these topics arguably fell outside the scope of the Government's pending motions. -11-

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On February 24, 2003, the Court granted leave for the Government to file a motion for renewed consideration of its still-pending motion to the Chief Judge for the reassignment of all the SNF cases to a single Judge. By order dated April 16, 2003, the Chief Judge entered an order directing that six SNF cases be designated as "lead" cases for the purpose of deciding the Government's summary judgment motions and suggested to the various Judges that all remaining SNF cases be stayed pending resolution of the lead cases. In 2003, the Court issued divergent decisions in five of these cases.11 Because the lead cases were proceeding without further coordination, and because some Judges presiding over SNF cases did not elect to follow the Chief Judge's suggestion that nonlead cases be stayed, the Government renewed its motion to consolidate all of the pending SNF cases, requesting that the Court do so in order to decide the rate and schedule of acceptance under the Standard Contract. See Defendant's Second Motion To Renew Its Motion To Consolidate, filed July 29, 2003. By order dated January 30, 2004, the Court denied the Government's second motion to consolidate based upon a determination that "consolidation even as to the particular issues of rate of acceptance and schedule of acceptance would not effectuate any greater efficient administration of justice than that of letting the six lead cases proceed with their dispositive motions and/or trial on damages." On April 30, 2004, in response to the filing of additional SNF cases, the Court convened a Court-wide status conference. At that hearing, or in status reports to the Court, counsel for many of the plaintiffs represented that they would not pursue duplicative discovery in their
11

See Commonwealth Edison Co. v. United States, 56 Fed. Cl. 652 (2003); Yankee Atomic Elec. Co. v. United States, No. 98-126C, slip op. (Fed. Cl. June 26, 2003); Indiana Michigan Power Co. v. United States, 57 Fed. Cl. 88 (2003). -12-

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individual cases against the Government. A. 3-8 and 14-15. In reality, exactly the opposite result has occurred. The Government has spent the past four years defending against a discovery onslaught by SNF plaintiffs that has literally consisted of repetitive and duplicative depositions of the same witnesses on the same topics in which various plaintiffs' counsel utilize, often, the same deposition questions. Compare, e.g., A. 23-30 with 33-37. The statistics set forth below illustrate the absurd nature of discovery in the SNF cases, which, although currently uncoordinated in this Court, is highly coordinated amongst the various SNF plaintiffs' counsel. Without the ability to coordinate discovery and litigation before this Court, the Government has been forced to respond repeatedly to redundant discovery requests and conflicting responses from different Judges of this Court to discovery demands by the plaintiffs. As of this date, the Government already has responded to 631 individual requests for the production of documents, produced more than 2.4 million pages of documents, and defended 117 witness depositions occupying 164 days. The Government's four principal witnesses, David Zabransky, Christopher Kouts, Thomas Pollog, and Robert Morgan, have spent approximately 266 hours over the course of 50 days providing deposition testimony to the plaintiffs. David Zabransky, for instance, has endured 19 days of deposition, testifying as either a RCFC 30(b)(6) deponent or a fact witness. Moreover, these same witnesses also have testified live and by designation at trial on 70 occasions. Whether at deposition or trial, the Government's principal witnesses have offered consistent testimony regarding core SNF issues i.e., development of DOE's waste management system and implementation of the Standard Contract. Notwithstanding this veritable library of Government testimony, SNF plaintiffs consistently notice Messrs. Zabransky, Kouts, Pollog, and Morgan to testify again and again on these very -13-

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same topics at deposition in individual cases. All but Mr. Morgan, for example, provided additional RCFC 30(b)(6) and fact testimony on April 22 and/or 23, 2008, in Dairyland Power Coop. v. United States, No. 04-0106C (Fed. Cl.). Moreover, the plaintiffs have propounded upon the Government numerous duplicative requests for the production of documents. For example, we have responded to 71 identical or substantially similar requests for documents relating to the following four core subjects: general date of performance by DOE, GTCC disposal, development and interpretation of the Standard Contract, and the general rate of SNF acceptance by DOE. A representative sample of the duplicative efforts undertaken by the Government in fielding SNF discovery requests appears below: Duplicative Deposition Testimony (All Government Witnesses)
Type of Discovery Coordinated Individual Totals Fact W itnesses Deposed Days of Fact W itness Depositions 30(b)(6) Witnesses Deposed Days of 30(b)(6) Depositions

10 79 89

27 102 129

3 19 24

7 24 31

Redundant Requests for Production of Documents (by Plaintiffs)
Type of Discovery Coordinated Individual Totals Date of Performance Generally GTCC Standard Contract Acceptance Rate Generally

2 27 29

2 13 15

2 9 11

2 14 16

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Government. For instance, during the course of coordinated discovery in 2002, the plaintiffs challenged the Government's assertions of deliberative process privilege over certain documents. The Discovery Judge upheld the Government's assertions, finding "precise and certain reasons for invoking the privilege . . . ." By order dated October 9, 2002, the Discovery Judge denied the plaintiffs' motion to compel the production of privileged documents, upholding the Government's assertions of deliberative process privilege, attorney-client privilege, or attorney work product protection over 300 documents. See Yankee Atomic Elec. Co. v. United States, 54 Fed. Cl. 306 (2002). By motion dated March 6, 2003, counsel for Yankee Atomic Electric Company ("Yankee Atomic") again challenged the Government's assertions of privilege before Senior Judge Merow, including the assertions already upheld by the Discovery Judge. This time, the Court directed the production of some documents, but sustained the remainder of the Government's assertions. In 2005, Pacific Gas and Electric Company ("PG&E") filed yet another motion, this time with Judge Hewitt, to compel the production of many of the very same documents at issue in the two previous challenges, as well as all of the Government's subsequent deliberative process assertions. On January 18, 2007, counsel for Dairyland Power Cooperative, who also represented Yankee Atomic and PG&E, filed a similar motion, urging the Court in briefing to direct the Government to produce the challenged documents to all of the utility plaintiffs, thereby "put[ting] an end to repetitive litigation of the deliberative process issues." In its June 29, 2007 order, the Court acknowledged "Dairyland's attempt `to champion the cause of other spent nuclear fuel plaintiffs,' as Defendant characterizes it," recognizing that this "amount[ed] in a practical sense to judge-shopping." Dairyland Power Coop. v. United States, 77 Fed. Cl. 330, -15-

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336 (2007). Ultimately, however, the Dairyland Court ordered the Government to produce more than one million pages of documents that the Court in other cases previously had determined had been properly withheld as privileged or had been withheld as far beyond the scope of reasonable discovery. Similarly, on July 13, 2007, Energy Northwest moved to compel the production of 256 documents withheld by DOE on the basis of deliberative process privilege, including all of the documents that PG&E had previously moved to compel, with the exception of documents relating to the issue of GTCC waste. This unnecessary relitigation of discovery issues has proved enormously burdensome to the Government, and it has resulted in the inefficient utilization of scarce judicial resources by the Court. Common legal and factual issues continue to predominate discovery in individual SNF cases. As discussed below, directing the coordination of discovery before a single Judge could eliminate, or at the very least minimize, the duplicative, wasteful, and abusive practices that have characterized SNF discovery by plaintiffs to this point. IV. THE GOVERNMENT'S CONSISTENT REQUESTS FOR COORDINATED DISCOVERY Following the Court's January 30, 2004 denial of the Government's second motion for renewed consideration of our motion for the reassignment of all SNF cases to a single Judge, we have consistently prevailed upon the Court to coordinate pre-trial discovery in these matters. Most recently, on September 28, 2007, acting pursuant to a Court order dated September 21, 2007, issued in Dairyland Power Cooperative v. United States, No. 04-106C (Fed. Cl.), we submitted to the Chief Judge a letter (at the Court's order requesting a letter submission) urging the reconstitution of coordinated discovery on a case-wide basis and summarizing the

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justifications for coordination. Only 14 days earlier, on September 14, 2007, we filed a motion in Energy Northwest v. United States, No. 04-10C (Fed. Cl.), for the entry of a protective order precluding the plaintiff's noticed RCFC 30(b)(6) deposition on topics about which Government representatives had thoroughly and repeatedly testified. That motion contained a request in the alternative for the reinstitution of coordinated discovery. Since March 2004, we have filed similar requests in numerous SNF cases pending before this Court asking for coordination of the SNF cases.12 ARGUMENT I. THE COURT HAS AUTHORITY TO DIRECT THE COORDINATION OF DISCOVERY AND LITIGATION ON A CASE-WIDE BASIS Pursuant to RCFC 1, the Rules of the Court of Federal Claims "shall be construed and administered to secure the just, speedy, and inexpensive determination of every action." RCFC 1. Indeed, this Court's rules unquestionably recognize that cases with common issues of fact may warrant consolidated pretrial management "[i]n the interests of efficiency and the conservation of resources." RCFC 40.2, Rules Committee Note, 2002 Revision. Specifically, RCFC 40.2 contemplates that litigants may seek a coordinated discovery schedule from the Court "[w]henever it appears . . . there are two or more cases before the court that present common issues of fact", and adoption of such a schedule would "significantly promote the efficient

We also discussed the need for coordinated discovery with the Court during status conferences before Chief Judge Damich on September 20, 2007 and August 7, 2007, and the Discovery Judge on April 30, 2004. -17-

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administration of justice."13 RCFC 40.2(b)(1) (emphasis added).14 The Judge assigned to the "earliest-filed case shall call a meeting of all of the assigned judges to determine what, if any, action is appropriate." RCFC 40.2(b)(3). Further, if multiple cases before the Court involve "a common question of law or fact", the Court may, among other things, "make such orders concerning proceedings therein as may tend to avoid unnecessary costs or delay." RCFC 42(a) (emphasis added). To facilitate case coordination, a Judge of this Court may by order transfer a case to another Judge upon agreement of both Judges "[t]o promote docket efficiency, to conform to the requirements of any case management plan, or for the efficient administration of justice." RCFC 40.1(b). Moreover, this Court's "chief judge may reassign any case if the chief judge deems such action necessary for the efficient administration of justice." RCFC 40.1(c). Recently, in a report forwarded to the Court on May 27, 2008, the Court's Advisory Committee recommended an amendment to RCFC 40.2 that would provide for the establishment of a standing three-Judge panel which would evaluate related case management plans and institute coordinated litigation proceedings when deemed appropriate. A. 43. This panel would have the authority to "order transfer, consolidation, adoption of a coordinated discovery schedule, or other action not prohibited by [the Court's] rules for the related cases." A. 44. In addition, the panel could "order that the related cases proceed in accordance with the procedures applicable to

RCFC 40.2 does not have a counterpart in the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. RCFC 40.2, Rules Committee Note, 2002 Revision. Pursuant to RCFC 40.2(b)(1), a party may file a Notice of Indirectly Related Case(s) to seek a coordinated discovery schedule. Given the permissive language regarding the notice, RCFC 40.2 does not explicitly foreclose the Court from issuing a coordinated discovery schedule on a motion of a party to one of the continuing cases. See RCFC 40.2(b). -1814

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multi-district litigation in federal district courts." Id. Although the Advisory Committee has recommended a modification to RCFC 40.2 to incorporate this recommendation on a permanent basis, the language of the current version of RCFC 40.2, as discussed above, currently allows the Chief Judge to institute appropriate coordinated litigation proceedings when appropriate. Accordingly, although modification of RCFC 40.2 to incorporate the recommendations of the Advisory Committee and to render them permanent is appropriate, the Chief Judge, under the current version of RCFC 40.2, currently possesses the authority to institute the type of threeJudge panel identified in the Advisory Committee's recommendation to consider and institute a coordinated case management plan for the SNF cases. In addition to the previous coordinated discovery efforts in this case as described above, this Court has successfully worked with parties to coordinate discovery in complex litigation involving multiple cases. For example, this Court in the Winstar litigation devised a plan for the coordination of, among other things, discovery in more than 120 cases relating to the effect of the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act on contracts allegedly executed between the United States and banks and their owners. See First Fed. Sav. Bank of Hegewisch v. United States, 63 Fed. Cl. 790, 791 (2005). Pursuant to an omnibus case management order, issued by then-Chief Judge Loren A. Smith on September 18, 1996 ("CMO"), all Winstar-related cases were reassigned to a single so-called Managing Judge "to provide consistent treatment of all matters related to Winstar cases, to conserve the resources of the Court and the parties, and for the efficient administration of justice . . . ." CMO at 2.a.; California Fed. Bank v. United States, 39 Fed. Cl. 753, 756-57 (1997), rev'd on other grounds, Suerr v. United States, 2008 WL 3089952 (Fed. Cir. Aug. 7, 2008) (one of the goals of common management of the Winstar cases -19-

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was minimization of "the onerous litigation and discovery burdens facing the government."). This coordinated approach to litigation of related cases has extended to other types of cases as well. See, e.g., Christopher Village, LP v. United States, 50 Fed. Cl. 635, 645 n.10 (2001) (noting that the Court has "worked with parties to coordinate discovery or briefing on related issues found in separate cases, where the cases share common legal issues but the individual claims for damages are predicated on very different factual questions."). II. THE COURT SHOULD INSTITUTE COORDINATED DISCOVERY PROCEEDINGS IN THE SNF CASES Given this Court's authority pursuant to the RCFC and its proven coordination of discovery in the Winstar litigation, the Court, acting through a three-Judge panel as recommended by the Advisory Committee, could and should fashion a similar plan to coordinate discovery on related issues in the SNF cases. As we previously discussed, the Federal Circuit has just issued decisions in several pending appeals of SNF decisions from this Court that directly implicate issues that are common to many, if not all, of the SNF cases. Given that many of the cases currently stayed will now move forward when these decisions become final, the Court should implement a litigation plan to coordinate the development of these cases and ensure that common issues are resolved in an efficient manner. Further, as past history has evidenced, there has been a tremendous amount of duplicative discovery by plaintiffs in the SNF cases, as well as efforts to obtain a broad scope of discovery for the SNF plaintiffs from a Judge in one case that other Judges of the Court have previously denied. The Court's coordination of discovery in the SNF cases would help to avoid the unnecessary costs and delay associated with the current discovery scheme and, thereby, promote the efficient administration of justice. As described in

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detail above, SNF plaintiffs have taken duplicative depositions and made redundant discovery requests. Moreover, plaintiffs have filed duplicative challenges to the Government's discovery objections and privilege claims before multiple Judges in this Court. Plaintiffs' duplicative challenges have, in some instances, resulted in incongruous and conflicting rulings on the same discovery issues. Coordinated discovery in the SNF cases would allow for efficient adjudication of common legal issues and increased judicial economy. Further, a single Discovery Judge like the Discovery Judge in the Winstar litigation would gain expertise with respect to recurring SNF issues. As a result, the Discovery Judge will be able to establish consistency with regard to prevention of abusive discovery tactics and deal efficiently with discovery disputes. The existence of a central authority for the resolution of discovery issues also will prevent further discommoding of all the Judges as to repetitious SNF discovery questions. Absent coordination, the duplication of discovery in the SNF cases will compound exponentially, as more cases reach the discovery stage. When this occurs, the Court will be increasingly called upon to resolve piecemeal disputes that otherwise could have been resolved in a single, coordinated effort. As many cases return to active status following the Federal Circuit's decisions, there should be coordinated approach to discovery, with all of the remaining plaintiffs taking whatever additional discovery they can justify at the same time. Discovery coordinated and overseen by a single Judge, who would be able to have a working knowledge of the issues in the cases and would be able to ensure consistent and uniform treatment of discovery in all of the SNF cases, would eliminate the Court's concern in Dairyland about the possibility of Judge shopping and the tremendous costs that result from it.

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III.

IN CONJUNCTION WITH COORDINATED DISCOVERY, THE COURT SHOULD IMPOSE A LITIGATION PLAN THAT WOULD RESULT IN RESOLUTION OF THE REMAINING SNF CASES As the Court is aware, many of the remaining SNF cases have been stayed pending

resolution of the appeals before the Federal Circuit. We believe that, through a coordinated approach that would allow the parties to take any remaining discovery in a consistent and coordinated manner, the parties should be in a position to resolve their claims more efficiently. Although the Government to date has produced over two million pages of documents which are available to all SNF plaintiffs, the Government has yet to obtain any discovery from the plaintiffs in the stayed cases. To assist in expediting the resolution of the remaining SNF cases, while allowing the plaintiffs to develop their damages claims in light of the guidance that the Federal Circuit provided to the parties in the pending appellate cases, we request that, as part of the creation of coordinated discovery proceedings, the Court order each remaining SNF plaintiff in any case to provide a detailed claim, supported by any reports from damages experts and other experts upon which any plaintiff intends to rely, within 60 days after the final resolution of the Yankee Atomic, PG&E, Sacramento Municipal, and Nebraska Public Power appeals. In addition, each plaintiff should be required within that 60 days to provide the Government with its production of documents and information consistent with the requirements of RCFC 26(a). If our plan is adopted, within 60 days after the SNF plaintiffs provide these materials to the Government, the Government will respond in two ways: (1) the Government will serve written discovery requests to the various plaintiffs in all of the remaining cases following the Government's review of the plaintiffs' claim materials; and (2) the Government will submit a -22-

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suggested scheduling plan, based upon the apparent complexity of the various SNF plaintiffs' submissions and the likely additional time for completion of discovery in each case, regarding the scheduling of further proceedings, including dispositive motions and/or trials, in the remaining cases. Subsequently, the Court would impose a scheduling plan that coordinates the various SNF cases through expedited resolution procedures, taking account of the comparative complexities of the various cases. Such a procedure also will allow for resolution of other common issues among the cases. Absent such a schedule, these cases will continue to be resolved in a haphazard manner, with unnecessary and extensive costs for the parties and, in particular, the Government. Through this motion, we seek to place limits upon the need to incur unnecessary expenses that could easily be avoided by appropriate coordination of the cases at the Court. Assignment of a single Judge to monitor these cases through discovery who would develop a solid working knowledge of the various issues in the cases and the discovery that has occurred in the past would greatly assist in this effort. Further, coordination would likely result in a more efficient and expedited resolution of the remaining SNF cases. To accomplish these goals, we respectfully request that the Court adopt this litigation plan for the remaining cases. CONCLUSION For the foregoing reasons, the Government requests that the Court assign a panel of three Judges to evaluate the Government's request for a case management plan and, further, that the three-Judge panel issue a case management order through which (1) a single Judge will preside over discovery issues arising in all cases involving claims for partial breach of the Standard

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Contract and (2) the Court will establish a litigation plan for the resolution of each the remaining SNF cases in a coordinated and cost-efficient manner. Respectfully submitted, OF COUNSEL: JANE K. TAYLOR Office of General Counsel U.S. Department of Energy Office of General Counsel 1000 Independence Ave., S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585 ALAN J. LO RE Senior Trial Counsel MARIANA T. ACEVEDO JOSEPH E. ASHMAN ANDREW P. AVERBACH PATRICK B. BRYAN CHRISTOPHER J. CARNEY LISA M. DONAHUE SCOTT R. DAMELIN STEPHEN P. FINN JEREMIAH M. LUONGO ANTHONY W. MOSES SONIA M. ORFIELD SCOTT C. SLATER SHARON SNYDER Trial Attorneys Commercial Litigation Branch U.S. Department of Justice August 21, 2008 GREGORY G. KATSAS Assistant Attorney General

s/Jeanne E. Davidson JEANNE E. DAVIDSON Director

s/ Harold D. Lester, Jr. HAROLD D. LESTER, JR. Assistant Director

s/ Marian E. Sullivan MARIAN E. SULLIVAN Senior Trial Counsel Commercial Litigation Branch U.S. Department of Justice Attn: Classification Unit, 8th Floor 1100 L Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20530 Tele: (202) 307-0365 Fax: (202) 307-2503

Attorneys for Defendant

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ATTACHMENT A Cases Under Submission: Wisconsin Electric Power Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 00-697C (Merow, S.J.) System Fuels, Inc. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 03-2624C (Braden, J.) Dominion Resources, Inc. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-83C (Bruggink, S.J.) Dominion Resources, Inc. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-84C (Bruggink, S.J.) Dairyland Power Cooperative v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-106C (Damich, C.J.) Cases in Active Discovery: Detroit Edison Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 99-926C (Williams, J.) PSEG Nuclear v. United States, Fed. Cl. 01-551C (Futey, S.J.) Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corp. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 02-898C (Wheeler, J.) Consumers Energy Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 02-1894C (Damich, C.J.) Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 2 v. United States, Fed. Cl. 03-2622C (Wheeler, J.) Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee v. United States, Fed. Cl. 03-2663C (Wheeler, J.) Arizona Public Service Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 03-2832C (Hodges, S.J.) Energy Northwest v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-10C (Damich, C.J.) Consolidated Edison Co. of New York v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-33 (Wheeler, J.) Southern California Edison Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-109C (Baskir, J.) Cases That Are Stayed Or Not Active: Florida Power & Light Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 98-483C (Baskir, J.) Power Authority of the State of New York v. United States, Fed. Cl. 00-703C (Damich, C.J.) Nebraska Public Power District v. United States, Fed. Cl. 01-116C (Allegra, J.) General Atomics v. United States, Fed. Cl. 03-2505C (Wolski, J.) System Fuels, Inc. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 03-2621C (Williams, J.) Entergy Gulf States, Inc. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 03-2625C (Williams, J.) Entergy Nuclear Generation Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 03-2626C (Lettow, J.) Entergy Nuclear Fitzpatrick v. United States, Fed. Cl. 03-2627C ( Damich, C.J.) Portland General Electric Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-9C (Bruggink, S.J.) Canal Electric Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-35 (Hodges, S.J.) Interstate Power & Light Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-67C (C. Miller, J.) Constellation Generation Group, LLC v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-68 (Margolis, S.J.) Cleveland Electric Illuminating Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-69C (Wolski, J.)

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PPL Susquehanna v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-70C (Baskir, J.) Wisconsin Public Service Corp. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-71C (Block, J.) FPL Energy Seabrook v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-88C (Hodges, S.J.) Union Electric Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-97C (Hodges, S.J.) TXU Generation Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-98C (Williams, J.) Kansas Gas & Light Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-99C (C. Miller, J.) Texas Genco, LP v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-100C (Wolski, J.) General Electric Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-107C (Wolski, J.) General Electric Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-108C (Wolski, J.) Rochester Gas & Electric Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-118C (Margolis, S.J.) Niagara Mohawk Power Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-124C (Margolis, S.J.) Niagara Mohawk Power Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-125C (Allegra, J.) Illinois Power Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 04-133C (Damich, C.J.) Northern States Power Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 07-608C (Wiese, S.J.) Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 07-875C (Merow, S.J.) Yankee Atomic Electric Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 07-876C (Merow, S.J.) Maine Yankee Atomic Power Co. v. United States, Fed. Cl. 07-877C (Merow, S.J.) Alabama Power Company v. United States, Fed. Cl. 08-237C (Merow, S.J.)

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APPENDIX

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INDEX TO APPENDIX DOCUMENT PAGE

Excerpts of Transcript of Status Conference, Spent Nuclear Fuel Discovery v. United States (April 30, 2004). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A 1 Excerpts of Status Report Regarding "Pre-Discovery Conference," Niagara Mohawk Power Corp. v. United States (May 7, 2004). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A 12 Excerpts of Deposition of Robert L. Morgan, Yankee Atomic Electric Co., et. al. v. United States (March 21, 2002). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A 21 Excerpts of Deposition of Robert L. Morgan, Northern States Power Co. v. United States (November 15, 2006). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A 31 Letter from G. Smith to Hon. E. J. Damich with attached Report of the Ad Hoc Committee on Related Cases of the CFC Advisory Council (May 27, 2008).. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A 38

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CERTIFICATE OF FILING I hereby certify under penalty of perjury that on this 21st day of August, 2008, a copy of this "DEFENDANT'S MOTION TO COORDINATE DISCOVERY AND DEVELOP A LITIGATION PLAN FOR THE SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL CASES" was filed electronically. I understand that notice of this filing will be sent to all parties by operation of the Court's electronic filing system. Parties may access this filing through the Court's system.

s/ Marian E. Sullivan