Free HCP QUICK FACTS - New Mexico


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The Workers' Compensation Handbook For New Mexico

What to Do In Response to "Bad Acts"
What is a "bad act?"...............................................................................................2
Bad acts related to coverage or premium ....................................................................... 3 Judicial Track compared to Enforcement Track: Advantages and Disadvantages ............... 4

Booklet C2:

The judicial track: Remedies through the workers' compensation court ....................4 Enforcement through the Regulatory System ...........................................................7
Process for judicial relief ............................................................................................... 5 Remedies through the court system............................................................................... 6 Process for administrative enforcement action ................................................................ 7 Criminal Referral .......................................................................................................... 8 Help from the Workers' Compensation Administration.................................................... 11 Workers' Compensation Handbook List of Booklets........................................................ 12

Questions about Bad Acts .......................................................................................9

The workers' compensation system is intended to provide injured workers, quickly and efficiently, with the medical care and indemnity benefits to which they are entitled, at a reasonable cost to their employers. For the system to function at its best, all participants have to be honest and trustworthy. That is a general standard, and it applies to everyone in the system.

Published by the New Mexico Workers' Compensation Administration, a state agency. Laws can change. Check for new information by calling 1-866-WORKOMP or 1-866-967-5667 or look on the Internet at www.workerscomp.state.nm.us

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The Workers' Compensation Handbook for New Mexico Booklet C2: What to do in response to "Bad Acts" _______________________________________

2007 Edition page 2

If any participant in the workers' compensation system is acting unfairly or dishonestly, the Workers' Compensation Administration (WCA) has the authority to get involved and respond. If you believe someone else is acting unfairly or dishonestly, or otherwise in violation of the law or rules, this booklet explains your options. This booklet explains the processes that are available to deal with all types of improper conduct by any participants in the system. For purposes of this booklet, no distinction is made among various forms of misconduct. Fraud, bad faith, unfair claims processing practices, late reporting and other violations of rules or statutes by any participant are all treated the same. In this booklet they are all called "bad acts." The WCA acts as both a court (judicial) system for resolving disputes related to claims and as a regulatory agency with a responsibility to keep the system fair. New Mexico law gives the WCA authority to handle bad acts under either or both of those functions. The following sections describe how those two processes deal with allegations of bad acts. As this booklet explains, the judicial process works for the individual benefit of the person or organization who was harmed. The regulatory enforcement process works for the benefit of the system. It is possible for both processes to take place at the same time. You can seek a judicial remedy for a bad act and also report the same act for regulatory enforcement.

Worker:
If you are an injured worker and not represented by an attorney, you will probably find it helpful to discuss your case with an ombudsman. The ombudsman can help you sort out the issues and determine which method is in your best interest. Ombudsmen are on staff at all WCA offices. Call the office nearest you. You can use a local telephone number or a toll-free number from anywhere inside New Mexico. See the back of this booklet for a list of all the offices and telephone numbers. You can also see an ombudsman in person. See Booklet C1, "When You Need Help with a Workers' Compensation Claim," for more information about the ombudsman program. Professionals in the system might not need the help of an ombudsman, but they may talk to an ombudsman if they wish.

What is a "bad act?"
The workers' compensation law recognizes different types of "bad acts." Most of these types of actions are not listed specifically but are mentioned in a general way in the law. In general, the law requires all parties to do the right thing and avoid trying to cheat the other parties out their rights.

Published by the New Mexico Workers' Compensation Administration, a state agency. Laws can change. Check for new information by calling 1-866-WORKOMP or 1-866-967-5667 or look on the Internet at www.workerscomp.state.nm.us

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The Workers' Compensation Handbook for New Mexico Booklet C2: What to do in response to "Bad Acts" _______________________________________

2007 Edition page 3

The workers' compensation law in Section §52-1-28.1 NMSA 1 describes "unfair claims processing practices" and "bad faith" as bad acts that could be committed by an employer or insurer against a worker. The law provides both a remedy for the worker (extra benefits) and a civil penalty (payment of a fine to the WCA). The law in Section §52-1-28.2 NMSA describes "retaliation" as an act by an employer to punish a worker who filed or attempted to file a workers' compensation claim. The remedy for the worker is that the employer is required to rehire the worker. The law also provides a civil penalty. For retaliation, the courts have decided that a worker can also seek damages outside the workers' compensation system. Fraud is a bad act that could be committed by any party, and might be a criminal offense. The section of this booklet titled "Criminal Referral" explains the criminal aspect of fraud allegations.

Bad acts related to coverage or premium
Some types of activities are outside the jurisdiction of the WCA, but the WCA may be able to assist a party in contacting another agency. For example, illegal acts related to coverage or premium might be referred to the Insurance Division of the Public Regulation Commission. The party who was harmed might also have a private cause for a lawsuit outside the workers' compensation system.

In this booklet are references to specific paragraphs of the workers' compensation law. These references are in a standard form. §52-1-28.1 NMSA means Chapter 52, Article 1, Paragraph 28.1 of the New Mexico Statutes Annotated (NMSA).

1

Published by the New Mexico Workers' Compensation Administration, a state agency. Laws can change. Check for new information by calling 1-866-WORKOMP or 1-866-967-5667 or look on the Internet at www.workerscomp.state.nm.us

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The Workers' Compensation Handbook for New Mexico Booklet C2: What to do in response to "Bad Acts" _______________________________________

2007 Edition page 4

Judicial Track compared to Enforcement Track: Advantages and Disadvantages
This chart gives a summary of the advantages and disadvantages of the two different ways of responding to a bad act in New Mexico workers' compensation. The rest of the booklet explains these two approaches.

Judicial Track Advantages:
ˇ ˇ You could receive a direct financial benefit or other benefit as a result of a favorable decision by a judge or a mediated agreement. You are in control of your own investigation and presentation of evidence.

Disadvantages:
ˇ ˇ You have to do the investigation yourself. You are responsible for the success of your claim or defense. You have to present the evidence yourself, or through your attorney, at the mediation conference and, if necessary, the formal trial.

Enforcement Track Advantages:
ˇ ˇ ˇ You provide information, and that's all you have to do. You do not have to be certain that the action of the other party was a bad act. By reporting a bad act, you are helping to make the system work fairly and honestly for everyone.

Disadvantages:
ˇ ˇ ˇ You have no control over what happens. The WCA investigates reports based on the Director's evaluation of the best use of limited resources. You should not expect any direct benefit from an investigation. You should not expect that the results of an investigation will be available to you for any legal action you are taking. You probably will not find out what happened as a result of your report.

The judicial track: Remedies through the workers' compensation court
The purpose of the workers' compensation court system in handling allegations of bad acts is to provide relief or compensation to the party who was harmed. When a bad act by one person or organization has resulted in harm to another, the person or organization who suffered the harm can ask for relief, usually in the form
Published by the New Mexico Workers' Compensation Administration, a state agency. Laws can change. Check for new information by calling 1-866-WORKOMP or 1-866-967-5667 or look on the Internet at www.workerscomp.state.nm.us
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The Workers' Compensation Handbook for New Mexico Booklet C2: What to do in response to "Bad Acts" _______________________________________

2007 Edition page 5

of money or a defense against another party's claim for money. The relief is limited to what is allowed under the workers' compensation law. For example, if an injured worker alleges that a claims adjuster processed the claim unfairly, and the judge finds that to be true, the worker could receive extra benefits from the insurer. If an employer alleges that a worker's claim is fraudulent, and the evidence supports that position, the worker's claim might be denied and the worker will receive nothing. This discussion involves legal terms. A few important definitions: PARTY means a person or organization that appears before a judge. A party could be the worker, with or without an attorney, or an individual who represents an insurance company or other payer, with or without an attorney. PLEADING means the complaint, usually filed by a worker, and the response to the complaint, usually filed by an employer or insurer. DEFENSE means the factual argument offered by a party opposing the other party's claim. RELIEF OR REMEDY means an order by a judge either granting a claim or denying a claim for some particular benefit. The relief or remedy can also be granted by agreement of the parties after mediation.

Process for judicial relief
Relief for someone who was harmed usually can only be awarded through the workers' compensation court system. There are a few exceptions where parties can go outside the workers' compensation system. Allegations concerning a bad act must be stated in the legal documents or pleadings that are part of the court file. For a worker, the allegation that someone else committed a bad act are usually raised in the complaint. For an employer or insurer, charges of bad acts should usually be raised in the response to a complaint. If you think you have been harmed by a bad act, you must raise the issue of the bad act in your pleadings. If you don't, the court could find that you waived your right to the claim or defense. A workers' compensation judge can allow pleadings to be amended when required for fairness ­ for example, if you learned about the alleged bad act only after the original pleadings had been filed. Once the allegation is part of the legal proceedings, the next step is to present the issue, along with other issues in the case, at a mediation conference. The mediation process is explained in Booklet C1, "When You Need Help with a Workers' Compensation Claim."
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Published by the New Mexico Workers' Compensation Administration, a state agency. Laws can change. Check for new information by calling 1-866-WORKOMP or 1-866-967-5667 or look on the Internet at www.workerscomp.state.nm.us

The Workers' Compensation Handbook for New Mexico Booklet C2: What to do in response to "Bad Acts" _______________________________________

2007 Edition page 6

The mediator may help you to resolve the issues with the other parties. You might reach an agreement about how to resolve the issues. If no agreement is reached, the mediator will write a recommended resolution of all issues including the bad acts issue. The parties can accept or reject the recommended resolution. As with any recommended resolution, if you wish to reject the recommendation, you must file your rejection within 30 days of receiving the recommended resolution. If either party refuses to accept the recommended resolution, the issue will be assigned to a judge for trial. If the allegation of a bad act is considered by a workers' compensation judge as part of a formal trial, it is up to the parties to present evidence supporting their cases, just as they do for all other issues. If you are claiming to have been harmed, you must also present a case for a remedy or relief, usually money, that is within the legal limits of the workers' compensation law. The judge's job is to make a decision concerning the bad act, based upon the evidence presented and the law. The judge will make a determination concerning the bad act and will decide on a remedy. If you claim additional attorney fees as a result of bad acts, the judge may conduct a separate hearing on those issues (§52-1-54 NMSA). In some serious cases, the WCA's enforcement bureau will step in and provide information in the form of a report to the judge and the parties. Once the report has been provided, it will usually be up to the parties to make use of the report in the case. If a party wishes to use the report to present evidence, or to block the presentation of evidence, that party is responsible for taking the necessary legal actions. Making a charge of this nature (such as bad faith, unfair claims processing or fraud) is a serious matter. If you do it, you should be prepared to present evidence supporting your charge. It is your responsibility to gather the evidence; the WCA will ordinarily not do this for you. Remember that alleging a bad act irresponsibly for the purpose of harassing or harming the other party is itself a bad act.

Remedies through the court system
The possible remedies for bad acts include: ˇ Up to a 25 percent increase in a worker's benefits for acts of bad faith or unfair claims processing or, for late payments, extra benefits equal to those that were late (§52-1-28.1 NMSA). ˇ Extra attorney fees awarded against the offending party (§52-1-54(I) NMSA). ˇ A complete or partial defense to a claim based on fraud or misrepresentation, and ˇ Other sanctions imposed by the judge.

Published by the New Mexico Workers' Compensation Administration, a state agency. Laws can change. Check for new information by calling 1-866-WORKOMP or 1-866-967-5667 or look on the Internet at www.workerscomp.state.nm.us

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The Workers' Compensation Handbook for New Mexico Booklet C2: What to do in response to "Bad Acts" _______________________________________

2007 Edition page 7

Enforcement through the Regulatory System
The purpose of regulatory enforcement is to protect the integrity of the New Mexico workers' compensation system and to deter improper behavior. When a bad act or practice violates the rules or law, the Director can use his authority under the law to order a participant to take an action or to pay a penalty. The Director can also limit the right of participants to appear on behalf of others and in appropriate cases can seek district court help in enforcing his orders and the Act. In cases of apparent criminal fraud the Director can refer the results of investigations to a district attorney. A WCA staff attorney may work cooperatively with a District Attorney to prosecute the case.

Process for administrative enforcement action
The process begins in the WCA by a report to the enforcement bureau (or in the case of an uninsured employer, a report to the employer compliance bureau). The enforcement bureau collects all reports of bad acts including reports from participants in the process and reports from WCA staff. Reported acts are tracked whether they appear to have been large or small, serious or trivial. The bureau does not make a pre-judgment as to whether a report is true or not true. The staff member delegated by the Director of the WCA, usually the enforcement bureau chief, makes decisions about which reports to investigate, following policies approved by the Director. The decisions are based upon the best and most equitable use of the WCA's limited staff and other limits. Investigative resources go primarily to cases alleging very serious bad acts such as criminal fraud and to cases where there appears to be "pattern or practice" of a person or organization doing the same thing repeatedly. If the staff finds that the allegations are not supported by evidence, or that the issue is not serious enough to warrant immediate action, the enforcement bureau may stop the investigation. The bureau can keep the results on file, in case the information becomes relevant to a larger matter such as pattern or practice. If the allegations are supported by evidence, then, following guidelines established by the Director, the enforcement bureau can proceed toward administrative action or criminal referral. In an administrative enforcement proceeding before the WCA, two parties are involved: the WCA and party who has been investigated (the responding party). The person who reported the allegation is not a party and may or may not be told that an enforcement action is taking place. Enforcement hearings are conducted by the Director or the Director's designated hearing officer under rules established by the WCA. The case for enforcement will be presented by the general counsel and the enforcement bureau. The responding party will be given fair notice and an opportunity to be heard.
Published by the New Mexico Workers' Compensation Administration, a state agency. Laws can change. Check for new information by calling 1-866-WORKOMP or 1-866-967-5667 or look on the Internet at www.workerscomp.state.nm.us
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The Workers' Compensation Handbook for New Mexico Booklet C2: What to do in response to "Bad Acts" _______________________________________

2007 Edition page 8

In cases where a hearing officer finds that a bad act did occur, the statute and the Rules of the WCA specify actions that can be taken by the WCA to enforce the law against bad acts, including penalties that can be set by the Director and enforcement through district courts. Except under specific conditions, the findings of the investigators will not be disclosed at all to a workers' compensation judge or to the opposing party in any claim, unless those findings become public as a result of a public civil or criminal action. The enforcement bureau might in some cases have information that would be appropriate to be presented to the judge in a workers' compensation lawsuit. For example, the law requires the Director to report findings on fraud investigations to a judge who is handling a related matter (§52-5-1.3(E) NMSA). When such a case occurs, the bureau will notify the parties formally by filing the proper motions to appear in court. There will be no informal communication behind the scenes about cases between the enforcement staff and the dispute resolution staff. This type of legal appearance is not restricted to instances of fraud in individual cases. It could occur, based upon a decision by the Director, in a number of other situations. For example, the law provides specific civil penalties (§52-1-28.1(C) NMSA) for a "history or pattern" of bad acts. No matter what the circumstance, the regulatory staff of the agency will follow formal legal process with notification to all parties, just as if it were not part of the same agency as the workers' compensation court.

Criminal Referral
Certain types of very serious violations can be considered crimes, subject to criminal prosecution and possible prison sentences. A criminal referral can result from an investigation by the enforcement bureau. The WCA does not have the power under law to hold criminal trials or impose criminal sentences. Only district attorneys have the power to prosecute, and only district court judges have the power to impose a criminal sentence in a felony case. The WCA can investigate allegations of crimes, develop evidence and submit the cases to district attorneys for criminal prosecution. Our New Mexico system of law enforcement gives the WCA this investigative capability so that workers' compensation fraud will be given proper attention by investigators with the necessary special knowledge. Investigating allegations of criminal fraud is one of the responsibilities of the enforcement bureau. A WCA staff attorney may work cooperatively with the district attorney on the criminal prosecution if the district attorney chooses. Fraud in workers' compensation is defined in the law as "the intentional misrepresentation of a material fact resulting in workers' compensation or occupational disablement coverage, the payment or withholding of benefits or an attempt to obtain or withhold benefits. The intentional misrepresentation of a material fact may occur
Published by the New Mexico Workers' Compensation Administration, a state agency. Laws can change. Check for new information by calling 1-866-WORKOMP or 1-866-967-5667 or look on the Internet at www.workerscomp.state.nm.us
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The Workers' Compensation Handbook for New Mexico Booklet C2: What to do in response to "Bad Acts" _______________________________________

2007 Edition page 9

through the conduct, practices, omissions or representations of any person" (§52-5-1.3 NMSA). The workers' compensation law states that sentencing for workers' compensation fraud shall be done according to the statute on fraud in the New Mexico criminal law (§30-16-6 NMSA). In a case of suspected criminal fraud, the investigator could find substantial evidence that fraud occurred, substantial evidence that fraud did not occur, or an inconclusive result. If the evidence is substantial that fraud did occur, the results of the investigation will always be referred to a district attorney. In cases where the evidence is inconclusive, the staff in consultation with the Director will decide whether to make the referral. It must be remembered that a criminal conviction in fraud, as in any crime, requires proof beyond a reasonable doubt. This is a different standard from evidence sufficient to deny a workers' compensation claim. Nothing in the workers' compensation law prevents a private individual or party from going directly to a district attorney to report an allegation of fraud. As stated earlier in this booklet, the function of the administrative enforcement process is to preserve the integrity of the system by making sure that bad actors are penalized and that repetitive bad acts are stopped. As with all law enforcement, it is intended to provide an incentive for individuals to behave properly by making them accountable for their actions. It is not to provide any benefit or remedy to individuals. If you want a benefit or remedy, you must ask for it through the court process. You have no right to an accounting of the actions of the enforcement bureau in response to your report. If you alleged that a fraud was committed, and you have a decision to make about payment of future benefits, you should not wait for the bureau to finish its investigation before making your decision. The bureau cannot prioritize its use of resources based on your allegation, or any other person's allegation.

Questions about Bad Acts
Q. What is fraud? Don't I have a right to know if the other party has committed fraud? A. The Criminal Code of the State of New Mexico defines "fraud" as "the intentional misappropriation or taking of anything of value which belongs to another by means of fraudulent conduct, practices or representations" ( §30-16-6 NMSA). If you think the other party committed fraud, you have a right to present your case to a workers' compensation judge and seek a decision in your favor regarding your workers' compensation dispute.

Published by the New Mexico Workers' Compensation Administration, a state agency. Laws can change. Check for new information by calling 1-866-WORKOMP or 1-866-967-5667 or look on the Internet at www.workerscomp.state.nm.us

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The Workers' Compensation Handbook for New Mexico Booklet C2: What to do in response to "Bad Acts" _______________________________________

2007 Edition page 10

You also may report your concern to the enforcement bureau. If evidence suggests the case warrants investigation for criminal referral, the investigation will be done as the resources of the bureau permit. However, the WCA cannot guarantee that any particular result will be made available to you at any particular time. Q. In one case, a worker lied about his injury, and the WCA judge decided that he was not entitled to benefits. But the worker was never accused of a crime. Why not? A. Criminal conviction requires a much higher standard of proof. It could be that the insurer or self-insurance program decided that, even though the worker was not entitled to benefits, the evidence was not strong enough that the worker intended to commit a crime, and therefore did not make a criminal referral. Or it could be that the case was reported but the enforcement bureau decided the evidence was not strong enough. Q. Will I be notified if someone has filed a report against me?

A. You will only be notified if action is being taken by the enforcement bureau in response to the report and if it is the appropriate time in the course of the investigation. The fact that a report has been filed does not mean that the WCA believes a bad act has occurred. The report is an unproven accusation until and unless it is investigated. All documentation of investigations is in confidential records of the WCA. Q. What happens if I found out that the other party committed a bad act a year or two after it took place? A. You can report a bad act to the enforcement bureau at any time. If it took place a long time ago this might affect the WCA's ability to investigate the allegation. You also have a right to file a complaint. The time lapse, the current status of your case and other factors may influence your likelihood of success. The judge will look at the law and the facts in every case. A worker who does not have an attorney can ask an ombudsman about these matters at any time.

Published by the New Mexico Workers' Compensation Administration, a state agency. Laws can change. Check for new information by calling 1-866-WORKOMP or 1-866-967-5667 or look on the Internet at www.workerscomp.state.nm.us

__________________________________________________________

The Workers' Compensation Handbook for New Mexico Booklet C2: What to do in response to "Bad Acts" _______________________________________

2007 Edition page 11

Help from the Workers' Compensation Administration
(See the list of offices and telephone numbers on the back page of this booklet) WCA publications
This booklet is one of the series The Workers' Compensation Handbook for New Mexico. Most of the booklets contain information about the correct way to act in workers' compensation matters. If you think someone has committed fraud, unfair claims processing or bad faith, information in the booklets may help you to figure out whether that person was acting improperly. You can get publications from any office of the WCA. Telephone to request publications by mail. You can also download publications from the WCA web site.

Personal contact
The WCA ombudsmen can assist you if you want to discuss any matter related to unfair claims processing, bad faith, fraud, retaliation or other bad acts. If appropriate they can refer you to the enforcement bureau, or they give you guidance about how to write a report. If you are going through the court system they can help you fill out the forms and get started with your claim. Call the Helpline number 1-866-WORKOMP / 1-866-967-5667, or your nearest WCA office.

WCA web site

www.workerscomp.state.nm.us

The booklets in this series can all be downloaded from the WCA web site.

To report fraud: a form for reporting fraud is on the web site under "Enforcement."

Published by the New Mexico Workers' Compensation Administration, a state agency. Laws can change. Check for new information by calling 1-866-WORKOMP or 1-866-967-5667 or look on the Internet at www.workerscomp.state.nm.us

__________________________________________________________

The Workers' Compensation Handbook for New Mexico Booklet C2: What to do in response to "Bad Acts" _______________________________________

2007 Edition page 12

This list shows new titles and numbering system that will be in effect when the 2007 revision is completed. Some booklets are eliminated and others are renumbered. There are some changes from the pre-2007 editions of the booklets.
To get the information you need: Contact any office of the Workers' Compensation Administration for printed copies OR All booklets can be downloaded from the Workers' Compensation Administration web site at www.workerscomp.state.nm.us

Workers' Compensation Handbook List of Booklets

Booklet Booklet Booklet Booklet Booklet Booklet

A1(E) A1(S) A2 A3 A4 A5

Workers' Compensation Quick Facts- English Compensación A Los Trabajadores Informes Básicos ( Spanish) Setting Up a Workers' Compensation Program The Workers' Compensation Coverage Guide for Employers and Insurance Agents Uninsured Employers' Fund Workers' Compensation Personnel Assessment Fee (WC-1)

Booklet B1 What to Do after an Accident Booklet B2 Benefits for Workers While They Cannot Work Booklet B3 Going Back to Work Booklet B4 Medical Care in Workers' Compensation (B5 and B6 will be discontinued) Booklet B7 Información del sistema compensativo para los empleados (Spanish) Booklet B8 Quick Facts for Health Care Providers Booklet C1 When you need help with a workers' compensation claim Booklet C2 What to Do In Response to "Bad Acts" (C3 through 5 will be discontinued) Booklet D1 Booklet D2 Annual Safety Inspections How to Develop a Safety Program (published by the Advisory Council on Workers' Compensation and Occupational Disease Disablement)

(On the web site, look under Employers)
E3 E4

Guide to Completing and Filing Paper Copy for Employers' First Report of Injury or Illness (Form E1.2) and Notice of Benefit Payment (Form E6.2) EDI Guide to Completing the Employers' First Report of Injury or Illness (Form E1.2) and Notice of Benefit Payment (Form E6.2) -- limited to certified electronic filers

Other publications

Health Care Provider Guide to New Mexico Workers' Compensation Guidebook for Employers in New Mexico (English and Spanish) Workbook for Injured Workers (English and Spanish) The Stay at Work/Return to Work Program Guide
Wcamjd 9/07

Published by the New Mexico Workers' Compensation Administration, a state agency. Laws can change. Check for new information by calling 1-866-WORKOMP or 1-866-967-5667 or look on the Internet at www.workerscomp.state.nm.us

__________________________________________________________

The Workers' Compensation Handbook for New Mexico Booklet C2: What to do in response to "Bad Acts" _______________________________________

2007 Edition page 13

NEW MEXICO WORKERS' COMPENSATION ADMINISTRATION
STATE HEADQUARTERS Mailing Address: Workers' Compensation Administration PO Box 27198, Albuquerque NM 87125 Location: 2410 Centre Avenue SE (near Yale-Gibson intersection) In-state toll-free phone: 1-800-255-7965 Local phone 841-6000 REGIONAL OFFICES: Southeastern regional office at Lovington: 100 West Central, Lovington, NM 88260 Telephone: 575-396-3437 In-state toll-free phone: 1-800-934-2450 Southwestern regional office at Las Cruces: 1120 Commerce Drive, Suite B-1, Las Cruces, NM 88011 Telephone: 575-524-6246 In-state toll-free phone: 1-800-870-6826 Northwestern regional office at Farmington: 3535 East 30th Street, Farmington, NM 87401 Telephone: 505-599-9746 In-state toll-free phone: 1-800-568-7310 Northeastern regional office at Las Vegas : 2515-2 Ridge Runner Road, Las Vegas NM 87701 Moving in 2008 to: 32 New Mexico 65, Las Vegas NM 87701 Telephone: 505-454-9251 In-state toll-free phone: 1-800-281-7889 Roswell Office: Penn Plaza Bldg., 400 N. Pennsylvania Ave., Ste. 425, Roswell NM 88201 Telephone: 575-623-3781 In-state toll-free phone: 1-866-311-8587 Santa Fe Office: 810 West San Mateo, Suite A-2, Santa Fe, NM 87505 Telephone: 505-476-7381 Internet web site address: http://www.workerscomp.state.nm.us/ HELP & HOTLINE: 1-866-WORKOMP / 1-866-967-5667

mjdwca 1/08

Published by the New Mexico Workers' Compensation Administration, a state agency. Laws can change. Check for new information by calling 1-866-WORKOMP or 1-866-967-5667 or look on the Internet at www.workerscomp.state.nm.us

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