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Employers' Guide to Industrial Insurance in Washington State
Review your insurance coverage and reporting requirements Take steps to prevent injuries and control costs

The information in this publication is current as of the publication date. Every attempt is made to keep the information up to date. Changes that occur periodically as a result of new legislation, administrative rule changes or court hearings will be included in subsequent printings. Note: We use the following terms interchangeably in this publication: industrial insurance and workers' compensation employee and worker Department of Labor & Industries, Labor & Industries, and L&I

PUBLICATION F101-002-000 [05-2009]

Contents
Chapter 1 ­ What Is Industrial Insurance? .......................................................................................... 1 Chapter 2 ­ Coverage and Exemptions ................................................................................................. 2
Mandatory Coverage .......................................................................................................................................2 Exempt Employment .........................................................................................................................................2 Employees Not Covered ............................................................................................................................2 Owners .........................................................................................................................................................3 Alternative for Non-public Corporations ................................................................................................3 Exclusion on Family Farms........................................................................................................................4 Optional (Elective) Coverage ..........................................................................................................................4 Insuring Minors .................................................................................................................................................4 Out-of-state Workers .......................................................................................................................................4 Independent Contractors ................................................................................................................................5 Contract Entertainers .......................................................................................................................................5 Self-insured Businesses .................................................................................................................................5

Chapter 3 ­ Opening an Account ........................................................................................................... 6
Employer Classifications ..................................................................................................................................6 Premium Rates ...................................................................................................................................................7 Employee Contributions....................................................................................................................................7 Experience Rating .............................................................................................................................................7 What is experience rating? ......................................................................................................................7 What is the experience period?...............................................................................................................8 How long will a claim affect my premium rates? ..................................................................................8 How do I know what my experience factor is? .....................................................................................8

Chapter 4 ­ Reporting and Record Keeping ........................................................................................ 9
How to File Quarterly Reports .........................................................................................................................9 Online ...........................................................................................................................................................9 By Mail .........................................................................................................................................................9 When Reports Are Due ...........................................................................................................................10 Determining Reportable Worker Hours .......................................................................................................10 Splitting Worker Hours ...................................................................................................................................11 If You Fail to File Your Reports or Pay Premiums ........................................................................................12 Record Keeping ...............................................................................................................................................12 Accident Records ............................................................................................................................................13 Audits.................................................................................................................................................................13 Posting Requirements.....................................................................................................................................14

Chapter 5 ­ Employee Benefits ............................................................................................................ 15
Types of Benefits .............................................................................................................................................15 Establishing an Employee's Gross Income ..................................................................................................17

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Chapter 6 ­ If an Injury or Illness Occurs .......................................................................................... 18
Filing an Accident Report ...............................................................................................................................18 What the Injured Worker Must Do ........................................................................................................18 What the Attending Provider Must Do .................................................................................................19 What the Employer Must Do ..................................................................................................................19 Discrimination Against Claimants.................................................................................................................19 Monitoring Your Employees' Claims .............................................................................................................19 Financial Protections for Employers ............................................................................................................20 Protection Against `Second Injury' Risks .............................................................................................20 Protection Against Catastrophic Accidents ........................................................................................20 Worker Recourse for Injuries Caused By a Third Party ....................................................................20 Preferred Worker Program.....................................................................................................................21

Chapter 7 ­ Prevent Injuries and Control Your Costs ....................................................................... 22
Focus on Safety ...............................................................................................................................................22 Know the Safety and Health Rules for Your Workplace ....................................................................22 Request a Safety and Health Consultation ..........................................................................................23 Send the Right Message to Your Employees .......................................................................................23 Manage Claims ................................................................................................................................................23 Consider Retrospective Rating......................................................................................................................24

Chapter 8 ­ If You Disagree with an L&I Decision ........................................................................... 25
Protest/Reconsideration ................................................................................................................................25 Appeal ...............................................................................................................................................................26

Appendix A .............................................................................................................................................. 27
Definition of an Employer ...............................................................................................................................27 Definition of a Worker .....................................................................................................................................27

Appendix B .............................................................................................................................................. 28
Responsibility for Independent Contractors ...............................................................................................28 Responsibility for a Subcontractor's Unpaid Premiums ...........................................................................29 Responsibility for Contract Entertainers......................................................................................................30

Appendix C............................................................................................................................................... 32
Sample Employer Forms .................................................................................................................................32 L&I Web Addresses and Toll-free Numbers ...............................................................................................34 Addresses and Telephone Numbers for Local L&I Offices ......................................................................35

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Chapter 1

What Is Industrial Insurance?
Industrial insurance coverage protects both workers and employers from the financial impact of a work-related injury or occupational disease. It pays for an injured worker's approved medical, hospital and related services that are essential to his/her treatment and recovery. An injured worker who is temporarily unable to work also receives partial wage replacement payments. As an employer or prospective employer, you must provide industrial insurance coverage for your employees. Coverage is mandatory. In return, you ordinarily cannot be sued for damages when a work-related injury or illness occurs. Employers purchase coverage through the Department of Labor & Industries (L&I). L&I manages all claims and pays benefits out of an insurance pool called the Washington State Fund. The fund is financed by premiums paid by employers and employees, not by general revenue taxes. However, employers may qualify for self-insurance if they demonstrate they have sufficient financial stability, an effective accident prevention program, and an effective administrative organization for an industrial insurance program. (See Page 5.) This publication is a general guide that explains Washington State's industrial insurance program. It is not a legal interpretation of industrial insurance law, but it will help you understand employers' basic legal requirements and suggest ways to minimize your industrial insurance costs.

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Chapter 2

Chapter 2

Coverage and Exemptions
Mandatory Coverage
Generally, employers of one or more employees must provide industrial insurance coverage. There are two ways to provide this coverage depending on the financial resources of your business. Most businesses participate in the state's industrial insurance program -- the Washington State Fund. Companies with at least $25 million in assests, and some governmental entities, may qualify for self-insurance. The Department of Labor & Industries, Insurance Services Division, manages the Washington State Fund. This fund derives its income solely from premiums paid by you and your employees. The fund receives no money from general tax revenues. The definitions of "employer" and "worker" used for industrial insurance purposes are located in Appendix A. All Washington workers must be covered through the State Fund or by a certified self-insured employer, unless they are subject to an exemption listed in the next section.

Exempt Employment
Employees Not Covered
You are not required to provide coverage for the following employees. These are the only exceptions allowed. 1. A domestic servant in a private home. However, if two or more are employed regularly for 40 or more hours each per week all must be covered.

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Chapter 2
2. A person employed to do gardening, maintenance, repair or similar work at an employer's private home. A person who is not a regular employee of the trade, business or profession of the employer and is not working at the employer's private home. This exemption refers to a person hired to perform a personal errand or chore that benefits the employer as an individual, but not the business. For example, someone hired to repair a flat tire on a personal car not used for business. A person working only in return for aid or sustenance from a religious or charitable organization. A child under age 18 employed by a parent in agricultural activities on the family farm. A horse-racing jockey who is participating in a racing meet. An employee who gets workers' compensation benefits through the Federal Employees' Compensation Act, Longshoremen's and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act, Jones Act, or Law Enforcement Officers and Fire Fighters Compensation Plan. A musician or entertainer who is working at a specific engagement and performing no other duties, who is not regularly employed by the purchaser of such services. The term purchaser does not include the leader of an entertainment group who regularly employs musicians or other entertainers. A newspaper carrier who sells or distributes papers on the street or from house to house.

Owners
1. 2. A sole proprietor or partner of a business. Members of a limited liability company (LLC) if they manage the company (and there are no managers), or managers of a LLC who are also members and who exercise substantial control in the daily management of the company. Only eight managers may be exempted unless all managers are related by blood within the third degree of marriage. Corporate officers of a public corporation are exempt if they meet the following criteria: a. A bona fide corporate officer who also is on the board of directors and a shareholder, being elected according to the corporation's bylaws and articles of incorporation, and b. Has the substantial control in daily management of the corporation, and c. Primary duties do not include manual labor.

3.

4.

3.

5. 6. 7.

Alternative for Non-public Corporations
Non-public corporations may exempt up to eight, regardless of the performance of manual labor, if they are bona fide officers, have substantial control in daily management of the corporation and are a shareholder. However, any number may be exempt if they are all related by blood within the third degree of marriage, and are bona fide officers. Corporations that choose to cover officers who may be exempt must apply to L&I for coverage. L&I will not honor claims unless an Application for Elective Coverage has been completed by the non-public corporation and filed with the department.

8.

9.

10. An insurance agent, broker or solicitor. 11. A cosmetologist, beautician or barber who rents or leases booth space. 12. A student volunteer (K-12th grade).

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Chapter 2 Exclusion on Family Farms
An adult child between the ages of 18 and 21 employed by a parent in agricultural activities on the family farm comes under mandatory coverage. To exempt the child or children, you must submit an Application for Exclusion/ Inclusion Mandatory Coverage (Family Farm).

Out-of-state Workers
If you have employees in other states or in foreign countries, please contact Employer Services in Tumwater at 360-902-4817 for detailed information about out-of-state coverage. The department maintains reciprocity agreements with several states. They are used to determine whether Washington's industrial insurance laws or those of another state cover an employee. Employers may request proof of coverage letters for employees temporarily assigned out of state. These letters prove your workers are covered by the Washington State Fund and often prevent employers from having to pay premiums in two different states for the same employee. They do not, however, override the laws of states that do not honor Washington State coverage. Out-of-state employers bringing their out-of-state employees to work temporarily in Washington may use their state's industrial insurance coverage if they have filed an "extra-territorial certificate" with the Department of Labor & Industries prior to arrival. Some exceptions apply. For example, an out-ofstate employer who is required to be a licensed contractor in Washington or is required to be prequalified under RCW 47.28.070 may not be able to use another state's coverage. Instead, when they do work in Washington with employees from another state, they must:


Optional (Elective) Coverage
State Fund coverage is available for individuals exempt from mandatory coverage (except those described in Item 7 under Exempt Employment). This coverage is referred to as optional or "elective" coverage. To apply for "elective" coverage, you must complete and return an Application for Elective Coverage. For more information, contact Employer Services in Tumwater at 360-902-4817.

Insuring Minors
Industrial insurance laws protect virtually all employees, including minors (workers under 18 years of age). Even minors working for a parent in the family business are covered. The only exception is a minor working on a family farm. (See Exempt Employment, Page 3.) Before you hire a minor employee, you must obtain a minor work permit endorsement to your Master Business License. The Department of Licensing or local offices of Labor & Industries can help you obtain this endorsement.

Obtain workers' compensation under Title 51 (State Fund), or Qualify as a Washington self-insurer, or Come from a state or province with which Washington has a reciprocal agreement and, if permitted by the agreement, file a certificate of coverage with L&I.

L&I can assess civil penalties or pursue criminal penalties on employers who violate child labor laws. For more information and to receive a copy of the brochure, Teens at Work: Facts for Employers, Parents and Teens, visit L&I's Web site at www.TeenWorkers.Lni.wa.gov or call 360-902-5315.



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Chapter 2

Independent Contractors
If you enter into a contract with an independent contractor who does not have employees or doesn't provide major equipment, you are probably required to provide industrial insurance coverage. See Appendix B for more detailed information on independent contractors. Appendix B also explains how you can protect your business from liability if subcontractors fail to pay required industrial insurance premiums for their employees.

For more information, or if you are interested in applying for self-insurance, please see the Employers' Guide to Self-Insurance in Washington State at www.Lni.wa.gov/ IPUB/207-079-000.pdf or contact: Self-Insurance Section Department of Labor & Industries PO Box 44891 Olympia, WA 98504-4891 Phone: 360-902-6867 or 360-902-6863

Contract Entertainers
If you contract with entertainers you may be required to provide industrial insurance. Appendix B contains more detailed information.

Self-Insured Businesses
Employers with substantial resources (at least $25 million in assets) and an effective accidentprevention program may qualify to provide industrial insurance coverage for their employees through self-insurance. To qualify, an employer must meet certain criteria as outlined in Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 296-15-021. A self-insured employer assumes all risks and costs of industrial insurance coverage. Selfinsurance employers manage all aspects of their workers' compensation claims, including authorizing benefits according to Title 51 RCW and paying all benefits out of company funds.The Department of Labor & Industries must certify self-insured employers. Reporting and record keeping for self-insured employers vary from those of employers covered by the State Fund.

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Chapter 3

Opening an Account
To obtain industrial insurance coverage through the Washington State Fund, you must open an account by completing and returning a Master Business Application. This form is available from offices of the Department of Revenue, Employment Security Department or Department of Labor & Industries. The form is also available from Master License Services in the Department of Licensing, Olympia, and from the Corporations Division in the Secretary of State's Office, Olympia. Once you open an account, you will be assigned an account manager who can answer questions specific to your company.

Employer Classifications
The basic premium for your industrial insurance coverage depends on the risk classification or classifications assigned to your business. There are approximately 300 classifications. Each refers to a type, or several types, of business activity and has its own basic insurance rate. This rate reflects the risk of workplace injury or disease in the industry as a whole. Generally, it is the business of the employer that is classified, not the separate occupations or operations of individual employees within the employer's business. When you apply for an industrial insurance account, State Fund underwriters will assign one or more risk classifications based on the type of business described on your application. If the classifications assigned to your business do not appear to be correct, or the nature

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Chapter 3
of your business changes, a change in your risk classification may be required. To request a change, or for more information on employer risk classifications, call Employer Services in Tumwater at 360-902-4817.

Employee Contributions
Under state law, a portion of the premium due, equal to one-half of both the medical-aid rate and supplemental-pension assessment, may be paid by employee contribution. Labor & Industries does not collect each worker's share directly. Instead, employers have the option to collect their employees' portion through payroll deductions. The maximum payroll deduction rate for each risk classification assigned to your business is shown on your rate notice. You can use any amount up to the amount shown on your rate notice, but it is illegal to withhold more than the authorized amount. Each pay period, calculate the amount you withhold by multiplying the payroll deduction rate (found on your Workers' Compensation Rate Notice) times the actual number of hours/units each employee worked. Some businesses choose not to make employee payroll deductions. These businesses still are responsible for paying the total premium due.

Premium Rates
Soon after you open your industrial insurance account with L&I, you will receive a Workers' Compensation Rate Notice. You also will receive a new rate notice whenever Labor & Industries adjusts premium rates or when your individual experience factor rating is recalculated. This rate notice tells you the rate you will pay per workerhour/unit for each risk classification assigned to your business. We refer to these hourly/unit rates as "composite rates" because they are a combination of three separate components: the accident fund rate, the medical aid rate and the supplemental pension assessment. The rate notice also shows these three elements individually. They work like this: Accident-fund premium. Only employers pay this premium. It provides money to pay non-medical claim costs such as wage-replacement benefits, most vocational rehabilitation costs, disability pensions and survivor benefits. Medical-aid premium. Employers and employees pay this premium. It pays for medical care and related services essential to an injured worker's recovery, including some vocational rehabilitation. Supplemental-pension assessment. Employers and employees pay this assessment. It provides cost-of-living increases to injured workers with extended disabilities. The rate is the same for all risk classifications.

Experience Rating
What is experience rating?
It is the result of your workers' hours or units (exposure) and claims (losses) occurring during a period that we call the "experience period." This result will affect your industrial insurance rates for a calendar year. Every eligible employer is experience rated on an annual basis. An eligible employer, as defined by Washington Administrative Code, is an employer who reported experience (worker hours or units) during a given experience period.

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Chapter 3
Businesses that have common majority ownership will be experience rated together on the same policy and share the experience factor. In most cases, businesses that are sold and continue to perform the same operations in Washington will have their experience transferred to the new ownership.

What is the experience period?
The experience period is the oldest three of the four fiscal years preceding the effective date of premium rates. (Fiscal year = July 1 through June 30.) The premium rates are effective on January 1 of each year. Labor & Industries calculates the experience factor by comparing your accident costs to the average costs of other companies having the same classification as your business. An experience factor greater than 1.0 indicates a business has had higher than average claim costs. A factor lower than 1.0 shows a business has had lower than average claim costs. New businesses usually start out with a factor of 1.0 until they become experience rated.

Once you open an industrial insurance account, you will be assigned an account manager who can answer questions specific to your company.
Claims with date of injury (DOI) and worker hours/units reported within the experience period will be used in calculating the experience factor for a given calendar year. This table shows which calendar year will be affected by the experience period. Experience Period 07/01/06 ­ 06/30/09 07/01/07 ­ 06/30/10 07/01/08 ­ 06/30/11 07/01/09 ­ 06/30/12 Covers Fiscal Years 2007, 2008, 2009 2008, 2009, 2010 2009, 2010, 2011 2010, 2011, 2012 Affects Rates for Calendar Year 2011 2012 2013 2014

How long will a claim affect my premium rates?
A claim will affect your experience rating and premium rates for three years. For example, a claim with a date of injury between July 1, 2005 and June 30, 2006 affects premiums for calendar years 2008, 2009 and 2010.

How do I know what my experience factor is?
The experience factor is printed on your Workers' Compensation Rate Notice. We determine your premium rates by multiplying your experience factor by the sum of the accident fund and medical aid base rates, then adding the supplemental pension assessment.

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Chapter 4

Reporting and Record Keeping
How to File Quarterly Reports
You can file your Employer's Quarterly Report for Industrial Insurance online or by mail.

Online
You have the option of filing your industrial insurance quarterly reports online and paying premiums with electronic fund transfer or paper check. Online forms automatically calculate premiums for you, eliminating the calculations you have to do yourself with paper reports. You can learn more and sign up for this free service at www.QuarterlyReports.Lni.wa.gov.

By Mail
Near the end of each calendar quarter, we will mail your quarterly report. Use this form to report hours (or other reporting units) for industrial insurance. (The report form includes instructions.) Employers who report on the "hour" basis will be asked to list the actual payroll and total number of hours worked in covered employment for the preceding quarter, broken down by industrial insurance risk classification. The composite rate for each risk classification assigned to your business is preprinted on the form. The rate is expressed in terms of dollars per worker hour/unit. For example, a rate of $.2550 means 25.5 cents per worker hour/unit. To determine the premium due, multiply the worker hours/units, not the payroll dollar amount, by the composite rate for each classification.

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You or your authorized representative must sign the quarterly report and return it with your premium payment to Labor & Industries. It is difficult to keep an accurate record of actual hours worked for certain types of employees. For this reason, other methods for determining the number of hours to report have been developed. If any of your employees fit into one of the following categories, use the method described to report their hours.

When Reports Are Due
Quarterly reports must be filed online or postmarked on or before the due date. Payment must be made by the due date. Otherwise, your report becomes delinquent and Labor & Industries imposes penalties. (See If You Fail to File Your Reports or Pay Premiums on Page 12.) If you do not receive your quarterly report before the close of the quarter, contact your policy manager or local Labor & Industries' office.

You can file your Employer's Quarterly Report for Industrial Insurance online or by mail.

Drywall employer. Premiums for drywall workers are based on the square footage of material purchased for the job. Contact the L&I office nearest you for details. Resident managers or caretakers of apartments, hotels, motels and similar employment. When your resident managers or caretakers work irregular hours and receive a fixed sum of money or other compensations, such as free or reduced rent, for their work, you must report and pay premiums using the following procedures:

Calendar Quarter
January 1 through March 31 April 1 through June 30 July 1 through September 30 October 1 through December 31

Quarterly Report Due By
April 30 July 31 October 31 January 31

If you have no worker hours/units to report, no premium is due. However, whether you file online or by mail, you still must submit a quarterly report marked "zero hours" or "no payroll."

Determining Reportable Worker Hours/Units
Generally, you should report the actual number of hours/units worked by your employees. Do not include sick-leave hours, vacations or holidays, even if it is paid leave. Report overtime work on a one-to-one basis, in other words, each hour of overtime work is reported as one hour, even though time-and-a-half wages may have been paid.

Divide each worker's total compensation for the quarter (salary plus the market value of other compensation) by the "Average Hourly Wage" for industrial insurance class 4910. You must call Employer Services at 360-902-4817 each April to obtain the updated Average Hourly Wage. Inside commissioned personnel. You must report the actual hours worked by all inside employees paid on a commission basis. Commissioned personnel. If you pay your workers a percentage of the amount charged for the product or service, they are commissioned workers. For commission employees who work primarily at your premises, you must report actual hours. For commission employees who work primarily away from your premises, you may report either assumed or actual hours worked,

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Chapter 4
if a daily record of actual hours is kept for each worker. You must report all of your commission workers using the same method (either assumed or actual hours). You must keep a record of the date each employee begins and ends employment. If you report assumed hours, you may report either eight hours for each day any work is performed or report 160 hours per month. If you are using the 160-hour rule, you may report 8 hours per day for new or terminated workers who work a partial month at the beginning or end of their employment. No reduction to reportable hours can be made for vacation, holiday or sick leave when reporting assumed hours. Salaried personnel. You may report salaried workers using either 160 assumed hours per month for each worker or report the actual hours worked, if a daily record of actual hours is kept for each worker. You must report all of your salaried workers using the same method (either assumed or actual hours). You must keep a record of the date each worker begins and ends employment. If you are using the 160-hour rule, you may report 8 hours per day for new or terminated workers who work a partial month at the beginning or end of their employment. No reduction to reportable hours can be made for vacation, holiday or sick leave when using the 160-hour rule. Optional "elective" coverages. If your business provides optional coverage for an owner (sole proprietor, partner, exempt LLC member or manager or corporate officer), you may report either 160 assumed hours per month or actual hours, if a daily record of actual hours is kept. If you have optional coverage for other exempt workers, other than jockeys, you must report their actual hours if paid on an hourly, part-time salaried, commission or piecework basis. Report 160 hour per month for full-time salaried workers under optional coverage. Piece workers. If an employee's pay is based on completing tasks that are measured by the pound, ton, acre, unit, foot or other method, you must report actual hours worked. Jockeys. You must report 10 hours for each mount in each race when reporting hours worked by jockeys who are provided coverage. (Coverage for jockeys is optional.) Employees of licensed racehorse trainers. Premiums for these workers are included in the licensing fee or renewal paid to the Washington Horse Racing Commission. Professional race drivers. You must report 10 hours for each heat or race during a racing event. You also must report 10 hours for any day your driver does not drive or ride in a race, but does perform other duties.

Splitting Worker Hours
The worker hours of any one employee may be divided for reporting purposes between two or more assigned basic risk classifications. This may be done only when accurate records of actual hours worked, supported by original timecard or time-book entries, document the division of duties. You may not divide a worker's hours between a "basic" classification and a "standard exception" classification, or between two standard exception classes. Standard exceptions are clerical office (class 4904), auto/truck/camper/trailer/mobile home/motorcycle and pleasure craft sales personnel (class 6301), door-to-door sales (class 6302), outside sales, (class 6303), LLC members/ manager (class 7100), corporate officers (class 7101), and permanent yard or shop (class 5206). If you do not keep accurate records of divided worker hours, all of a worker's hours must be reported in the highest rated classification in which the worker has duties. Estimates or percentages are not acceptable documentation for splitting hours.

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Employers may reduce premium costs in cases where dividing a worker's hours between risk classifications is allowable. If you are unsure if a division is allowed for a particular situation, please contact the L&I office nearest you. Other penalties may be assessed for nonpayment of premiums, misrepresentations, excessive deductions from employees, failure to keep adequate payroll records or other violations.

If You Fail to File Your Reports or Pay Premiums
If you fail to file a quarterly report, L&I will estimate the premiums due based on the best information we have available and we will take steps to collect the premiums owed. We also assess penalties on delinquent accounts. The longer the account is delinquent, the greater the penalty. The minimum penalty is $10. You must submit a report even if you report no hours/units. A late report indicating "no hours/units" will be assessed a $10 penalty. Interest will be assessed on all delinquent accounts at a rate of 1 percent per month on the premium owed. We count the number of calendar days elapsed since the due date including the date we receive the report or payment.

Record Keeping
State law requires every employer to keep records that will allow Labor & Industries to compute premiums. These records must be open for examination by L&I. Accurate, properly maintained records will help you manage your business and, in case of an audit, minimize the time needed for an accurate review. To properly document hours reported on quarterly reports, maintain the following payroll and time records on each employee for at least three years:




Employee name, address and Social Security number Date hired (and terminated, if applicable) Job title and type of work performed (see "Splitting Worker Hours")

Delinquent Accounts
Days Delinquent 1st month overdue 2nd month overdue 3rd month overdue 4th month overdue and thereafter Penalty 5% penalty ($10 minimum) + 1% interest on the premium owed Additional 5% penalty + 1% interest on premium owed Additional 10% penalty + 1% interest on premium owed Additional 1% interest on premium each month

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Type of compensation (hourly, salary, etc.) Pay period Actual hours worked each day You must keep records of actual hours worked for workers paid on an hourly or piecework basis. The number of units earned or produced for piece workers must also be recorded. Keeping records of the actual hours that outside commissioned and salaried employees work is optional. If an employee is assigned to more than one risk classification, records of actual hours worked each day must also show how many hours the employee worked in each class.





Corporation documents Articles of Incorporation Bylaws Minutes of meetings Contracts Invoices Financial statements Worksheets maintained for industrial insurance reports Subcontractor records Legal name Registration or license number UBI or L&I account ID number





Accident Records
Keep complete records of all accidents, including minor ones. Even minor mishaps sometimes turn into injuries that require medical attention. Accident-related records you should keep are:




Gross pay Deductions from earnings and the purpose of each deduction Net pay Check numbers of checks issued


In addition to payroll and time records, the following tax records also need to be maintained for at least three years: Unemployment tax returns from the Employment Security Department State excise tax returns from the Department of Revenue Internal Revenue Service forms and tax returns. For example, W-2 statements, Form 941 (quarterly report), Form 1099 (miscellaneous income), Form 1065, Form 1040 (Schedule C)




The injured worker's report of accident The supervisor's report of accident Industrial insurance claim log Claim date record

Use these records for completing the Employer's Report of Industrial Injury or Occupational Disease form or when resolving claim disputes.

Audits
Labor & Industries may audit your employment records. During an audit, an L&I auditor will inspect your business operations and examine records to verify that your workers' payroll and hours have been reported accurately. An L&I auditor also will ensure that worker hours and claims associated with your account are in the appropriate risk classification.

Other records and information that may need to be referenced include:


Check registers Canceled checks Cash disbursement journal (materials and supplies; miscellaneous contract labor)

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Chapter 4

Posting Requirements
Industrial insurance law and regulations that Labor & Industries enforces require employers to post the following information.

Required Posters
L&I will send you three posters that inform your employees of their rights and responsibilities as workers. They must be displayed where employees can see them. The required posters are:


Certificate of Coverage
You are required to obtain a certificate of insurance coverage and post it conspicuously in your place of business. You must have a separate certificate of coverage in each business location you operate. The certificate is issued when you open your account with L&I. You can obtain replacements by calling the L&I office nearest you. (We have listed these telephone numbers at the back of this publication.)



Notice to Employees ­ Industrial Insurance (F242-191-909) Job Safety and Health Law (F416-081-909) Your Rights as a Worker (F700-074-909)

You can obtain copies of these posters by calling any local L&I office or ordering online at www.Posters.Lni.wa.gov.

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Chapter 5

Employee Benefits
Employees are eligible for industrial insurance benefits when a work-related injury or occupational illness occurs. Benefits also are paid if an employee is injured during a meal period at the job site, even though the person was not working at the time. Benefits are not paid for intentional self-inflicted injuries or for injuries to an employee who is committing or attempting to commit a felony. All benefit levels and the conditions for benefits normally are set by the state Legislature.

Types of Benefits
Medical services. If your employee's claim is accepted, L&I pays for all approved healthcare providers, hospital, surgical, pharmacy and other health-care services necessary for the treatment of your employee's workplace injury or occupational disease. Usually, there are no out-of-pocket expenses to you or your employee. Injured employees may select a health-care provider who is qualified to treat their injury or occupational disease. Other services may include, but are not limited to, emergency ambulance service, special or home nursing care, dental repair, convalescent center care, crutches, braces, artificial limbs, glasses and hearing aids. Some automobile and home modification costs are covered for employees suffering amputation or paralysis. These employees also receive lifetime prosthesis maintenance, including replacements needed because of normal wear-and-tear of the prosthesis or related physical changes.

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Chapter 5
Damaged clothing. In some cases, benefits may cover the cost of personal clothing, footwear or protective equipment that is damaged or lost because of a workplace injury. The same is true if those items are lost or damaged because of emergency treatment offered on the scene. Receipts for repair or replacement of articles are required. Travel expenses. L&I can reimburse preapproved out-of-pocket travel expenses when the injured worker must travel more than 10 miles one way from his or her home to receive adequate health care services. Time-loss compensation payments (wagereplacement benefits). Employees receive a percentage of their regular wages if they are unable to work because of an industrial injury or illness. These are known as time-loss compensation payments. The employee is not paid for the day of injury or the first three calendar days after the injury unless he or she is unable to work for a period of 14 or more consecutive calendar days from the date of injury. An unsuccessful attempt to return to work within the 14-day period will not affect eligibility for payment for the first three days following the day of injury. If the employee becomes disabled later than three days after an injury, time-loss compensation payments begin on the first day he or she is unable to work. Time-loss compensation payments range from 60 percent to 75 percent of the injured worker's gross wage and certain benefits, depending upon the worker's marital status and number of children at the time of injury. Also, these benefits cannot exceed certain limits based on a percentage of the state's average wage. (The state's average wage varies; it is established by the Employment Security Department on July 1 of each year.) These benefits are based on a standard formula established by law. The maximum benefit ranges from 75 percent to 120 percent of the state's average wage depending on the date of injury. See Establishing an Employee's Gross Income on Page 17. Vocational rehabilitation. Injured employees who are unemployable as a result of their industrial injuries may qualify for vocational rehabilitation services. If appropriate, an injured worker will be referred to a vocational rehabilitation counselor for returnto-work assistance. A worker may be referred for vocational services at that time, or later, as the need occurs. You will be informed of any decisions about vocational rehabilitation. Vocational retraining benefits may be allowed. Retraining may include on-the-job training or a formal vocational program. Other return-to-work help. Labor & Industries can contribute up to $5,000 to help you modify a job to fit an injured employee's abilities. Your employee may pursue suitable work with a different employer only when you do not have any appropriate jobs available. Permanent partial disability awards. If your employee's industrial injury or occupational disease caused permanent loss of bodily function, he or she will receive a permanent partial disability award. The amount the employee receives for any physical loss is established by the Legislature and does not include compensation for pain and suffering. There are two types of permanent partial disabilities: 1. Specified disabilities: Some disabilities have awards that are already set by law. These are quantified losses, such as loss of vision or hearing, or the loss of an eye, leg, foot, toe, arm or finger by amputation. 2. Unspecified disabilities: These disabilities include every other type of impairment such as back injuries, caused by an on-the-job injury or occupational illness. For "unspecified" disabilities, the extent of total bodily damage determines the amount of the award. Qualified doctors use nationally recognized medical standards and guidelines to make this determination.

16

Chapter 5
Pension awards. A monthly pension for life is granted to an employee whose injury or illness results in permanent inability to work, based on medical and vocational reports. Pensions also are granted if the accident results in the loss of both legs or both arms, or the loss of a leg and an arm, or a complete loss of eyesight. Pension benefits are referred to as permanent total disability (PTD) awards. If a pensioned employee returns to work for wages, the pension will be terminated. An employee who claims benefits after voluntarily retiring is ineligible for total disability benefits. Survivor benefits. The surviving spouse and legally dependent children receive a monthly pension if a work-related injury or occupational illness results in an employee's death. The amount they receive is based on the formula used for setting time-loss compensation payments. In addition, survivors receive an immediate cash payment of 100 percent of the state's average wage, plus funeral expenses of up to 200 percent of the same wage for deaths that result from injuries. The wage changes each July 1. If the surviving spouse remarries, he or she may choose either a final cash settlement or the right to resume monthly pension payments if the marriage is terminated. The employee's dependent children continue to receive monthly benefits while they are dependent, even if the surviving spouse remarries. Pension options. If employees who filed claims after July 1, 1986, choose to receive a full pension and subsequently die of causes unrelated to an industrial injury or illness, their survivors will not be eligible for pension payments. However, employees may choose to take a reduced pension. In that case, should they die of causes unrelated to their injury, their survivors will continue to receive pension payments.

Establishing an Employee's Gross Income
When calculating an employee's benefits, L&I will first establish the employee's gross income at the time of the injury.* L&I will issue a "wage order" providing the employee and you with the information that was used to calculate the employee's gross monthly income.
* If your employee has an occupational disease, gross income is based on the date the employee was last exposed, first required medical treatment or became disabled, whichever came first.

The following are used to calculate gross monthly income:


Gross wages earned before taxes, including income from a second job. Employer-provided medical, dental and vision benefits. The reasonable value of room and board, housing, fuel or similar considerations received from the employer as part of the employee's income. Any bonus the worker received as a part of the contract of hire with the employer at the time of injury. Tips reported by the employer for federal income tax purposes. Normally worked overtime hours or overtime pay may also be included.





















If your employee's work pattern is determined to be exclusively seasonal, essentially part-time or intermittent, his/her gross monthly income would be determined by averaging the total wages earned, including overtime pay and tips, from all employment in any 12 successive calendar months preceding the injury that most fairly represents the employee's employment pattern.

17

Chapter 6

If an Injury or Illness Occurs
Filing an Accident Report
If a job-related injury or illness occurs, you and your employees have certain legal responsibilities.

What the Injured Worker Must Do


Report the injury or exposure and how it happened to a supervisor as soon as possible. Even minor injuries should be reported, but failure to report will not cause rejection of a claim. If medical attention is required, tell the treating health-care provider the injury is job-related. The provider will provide a Washington State Fund Report of Industrial Injury or Occupational Disease (called the "report of accident"), which serves as the official claim form. Labor & Industries must receive the accident report (claim) within one year of the date of injury. For occupational disease or illnesses, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, noiseinduced hearing loss, occupational dermatitis and occupational asthma, the report of industrial injury or occupational disease must be filed within two years of receiving written notice from a doctor that the condition exists and is work-related. Complete the worker's section of the report of injury. All questions must be answered to avoid a possible delay in benefit payments.







18

Chapter 6 What the Attending Health-Care Provider Must Do
The attending health-care provider also fills in a section of the report of accident. The provider must supply information such as the diagnosis and treatment given and provide an estimate of how many days your employee will be unable to work. Attending providers are responsible for mailing this report to L&I.

If you question the validity of the claim, say so on the form and explain your reasons. This will help minimize invalid claims. You also should indicate if someone not employed by you caused the accident. Complete records of facts and all evidence surrounding the accident can be used to document the case and is to your advantage. (See Worker Recourse for Injuries Caused by a Third Party on Page 20.)

Upon receiving the report of accident L&I mails a letter and Employer Report of Industrial Injury or Occupational Disease form to you. It serves as your official If a job-related injury or illness occurs, you and notice that your employees have certain legal responsibilities. a claim for benefits has been filed by one of your employees.

What the Employer Must Do


Discrimination Against Claimants

Make sure your employee immediately obtains required medical care from the doctor or hospital of his or her choice. Provide transportation or emergency ambulance service, if needed. The department will reimburse you for these transportation costs upon written request. When you receive a request for employer information from L&I, complete and return the information as soon as possible. Please answer all questions completely and legibly. If you notice errors in the form you receive, provide corrected information. Accurate wage and certain benefit information is important because it is used to calculate time-loss compensation benefits for the injured employee. Verify your employee's information, such as gross wages, hours worked and number of children at the time of injury.



The law prohibits you from discriminating against employees in any way for exercising their rights under the industrial insurance law or for filing a complaint about workplace safety. However, it does not prevent you from taking action against an employee for unsafe work practices.



Monitoring Your Employees' Claims
You will receive written notice of all decisions made about claims involving your employees. For example, you will receive a notice if one of your employees becomes eligible for time-loss compensation benefits. It will tell you the amount to be paid by the State Fund and for how long. You will also receive a monthly Firm Statement of Awards. This is a summary of all medical payments made for that employee during the past month.

19

Chapter 6


When L&I closes your employee's claim, we will send you a Notice of Decision (also called an "order"). This order will tell you if the injured worker is being granted an award for partial or total disability and, if so, how much the award will be. By routinely checking these reports, you can stay informed of injury costs charged to your account. You can monitor your employee's progress and correct overpayments of time-loss benefits or medical costs. (See If You Disagree With a Decision on Page 25.) Monitoring claims cost is important because L&I uses these costs in computing your premium rates.

Relief of certain pension costs. If a worker's death or permanent total disability is caused by the combined effect of a previous disability and a new industrial injury, and not by the injury alone, all claim costs not directly related to the new injury will be paid out of the Second Injury Fund. Only those claim costs directly related to the new industrial injury will go on your accident experience record. This separation of claim charges prevents your account from being penalized for death or pension benefits when such benefits are not your obligation.



Financial Protections for Employers
Protection Against `Second Injury' Risks
There are special situations, called "second injury claims," in which certain claim costs are not charged back to you and do not affect your experience rating. Instead, these claim costs are paid from the Second Injury Fund, which was created to encourage employers to hire previously disabled workers. It protects you against certain financial risks should such workers suffer further injury after you hire them. The Second Injury Fund comes to your aid in two ways:

Relief of all claim costs. The Second Injury Fund also is used to pay all claim costs arising from a preferred worker claim.

Protection Against Catastrophic Accidents
Washington's industrial insurance system protects employers against massive losses that can result from a major catastrophic accident. When a single accident kills or permanently disables three or more of your employees, all non-medical claim costs are paid out of a special "catastrophic injury account." Your accident experience record is only charged for the cost of two single pension claims ­ each equal to the average of all pension claims resulting from that catastrophic accident.

Worker Recourse for Injuries Caused By a Third Party
If one of your workers suffers a job-related injury or occupational disease, he or she cannot ordinarily sue you. However, the injured worker may take legal action to

20

Chapter 6
recover damages if someone not in your employ ­ a "third party" ­ was responsible for the injury. Third-party actions involve negligence on the part of someone not working for you. For example:


remaining recovery and how long the worker is unable to work or continues to receive medical care.

Preferred Worker Program
Under the Preferred Worker program, you can hire qualified employees, who previously have been injured, and receive the following financial benefits:






The driver of a vehicle that hit the worker. The manufacturer of a defective product that injured the worker. A property owner who failed to properly maintain the premises. The owner of an animal that bit the worker.

How does third-party action benefit you, the employer? Successful third-party action benefits you because the amount recovered can be credited to your industrial insurance account, reducing the effect the claim has on your experience rating. (See Page 7.) Keep in the mind the following points about third-party action. If you have questions, contact the Third Party Section at 360-902-5100.


Premiums waived. You are exempt from paying the accident-fund premium and medical-aid premium on the worker for up to three years after you initially hire him or her. (However, you and the worker must pay the supplemental-pension assessment.) No injury costs. No claim costs will be charged against your account if the worker is injured on the job within three years of becoming a preferred worker. Instead, the Second Injury Fund will pay any new claims costs. Therefore, your experience rating isn't affected.



The injured worker may initiate thirdparty action or Labor & Industries may, if the worker chooses not to do so. The employer cannot initiate this action. The injured worker continues to receive workers' compensation benefits while he/ she or L&I pursues legal action. L&I approval is required for any settlement that doesn't cover the costs of the claim. If the injured worker receives a financial settlement and has funds remaining after repaying claim costs, his/her workers' compensation benefits would stop. Benefits might resume in the future depending on the amount of the



You receive these cost-saving benefits when you hire a worker who must change jobs because of an industrial injury or occupational disease. If you wish to hire a preferred worker, you must complete the "Intent to Hire a Preferred Worker" form and mail it to L&I before the person starts work. Information on the program, along with the necessary form, is available from the L&I office nearest you or online at www.PreferredWorker.Lni.wa.gov . If a preferred worker is hurt on the job, be sure to say in your incident report that you hired the person under the Preferred Worker Program.





21

Chapter 7

Prevent Injuries and Control Your Costs
Preventing an injury or illness is the most effective way to protect your employees and limit the financial impacts of industrial insurance claims. You can also take other steps to manage a claim, if one occurs, to help reduce claims-related costs.

Focus on Safety
Know the Safety and Health Rules for Your Workplace
The Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act (WISHA) gives the Department of Labor & Industries, Division of Occupational Safety and Health (DOSH), responsibility for developing and enforcing workplace safety and health rules. You can find these rules on L&I's Web site at www.SafetyRules.Lni.wa.gov or you can contact the L&I office nearest you for more information. Your compliance with these rules helps you protect your employees from workplace hazards. Here are two examples: Rule Example 1: You are required to develop and maintain an accident prevention program (APP) tailored to the hazards of your specific workplace. To learn more about developing an APP, visit www.SafetyProgram.Lni.wa.gov or call the L&I office nearest you. Rule Example 2: You must make sure all employees have access to first-aid trained

22

Chapter 7
personnel. First-aid kits also must be available in the workplace. If you have 50 or more employees working on one shift at one location, you also must have a first-aid station. For information on first-aid training classes, you can contact the American Red Cross, Evergreen Safety Council or your local fire department, hospital or community college.

Send the Right Message to Your Employees
Make your commitment to safety clear to your employees. Take positive steps to build a safety "culture." And don't tolerate behavior that disregards WISHA rules and safe work practices. Positive steps you can take include:


Request a Safety and Health Consultation
Do you know the WISHA requirements that apply to your business? If you're not sure, you may want to request a safety and health consultation from L&I. A consultant ­ not an inspector ­ will meet with you and conduct a walkthrough survey of your worksite to identify hazards and recommend remedies. You must correct in a timely manner any serious hazards found during the consultation, but the consultant will not issue a citation or fine you. The goal of a consultation is to help you self-monitor your work environment so you can recognize hazards and fix them before accidents occur. If you comply with safety and health rules, your employees will be better protected than if you simply tell them, "Be careful." To request a free consultation, visit www.SafetyConsultants.Lni.wa.gov or call the L&I office nearest you and ask to speak to the Consultation Manager. In addition to safety and industrial hygiene consultations, specialists in ergonomics and risk management are available to assist employers as well.

Develop a written safety and health policy and share it with employees. A policy communicates your commitment to safety and health and defines what is expected of workers. Encourage employees to come forward with safety concerns. Employees are often best source of ideas for making changes that reduce workplace hazards. Empower your safety committee and hold regular meetings. Discuss safety in your orientation for new employees. Provide the training employees need to do new jobs or tasks safely.









Visit the Safety section of L&I's Web site to learn more about the safety and health services available to employers: www.Lni.wa.gov/Safety/TrainTools/ . These services include online training programs, publications, a video library and other training aids to help you build a strong safety culture.

Manage Claims
Prevention through safety is the best defense against the emotional costs of a workplace injury and the financial impact of a workers' compensation claim. However, you should have a system in place to manage a claim, if an injury does occur. At a minimum, this system should include:

23

Chapter 7


Investigate any accident or "near miss." The purpose is not to fix blame or deny benefits to anyone injured, but to determine what steps can be taken to avoid such accidents in the future. (See Accident Records on Page 13.) Monitor claims consistently by assigning one person to handle them. (See Monitoring Your Employees' Claims on Page 19.) You will want to keep track of important dates and deadlines for protests or appeals. Learn about and take advantage of returnto-work strategies. The goal is to get an injured worker back to work as soon as possible. For example, some workers can carry out different tasks or work part time until they are fully recovered. Under the right circumstances, "modified" or "light duty" can speed recovery. Returnto-work strategies also can reduce the cost of time-loss benefits, which in turn helps minimize increases in premium rates.

Consider Retrospective Rating
If you are committed to operating a safe workplace, preventing accidents and managing workers' compensation claims effectively, you may be interested in L&I's Retrospective Rating Program (Retro). Retro is an optional financial incentive program offered by Labor & Industries to help qualifying employers reduce their industrial insurance costs. Employers can enroll on their own or in a group plan sponsored by a trade association or professional organization. Employers may receive premium refunds or they may be assessed additional premium based on their performance. Enrollment in this program occurs four times each year. Coverage runs for one year, beginning January 1, April 1, July 1 or October 1. For more information, contact: Department of Labor & Industries Retrospective Rating Program PO Box 44180 Olympia, WA 98504-4180 Phone: 360-902-4851





For more information about managing claims effectively, contact the L&I office nearest you and ask to speak to a risk management specialist.

Monitoring claims cost is important because L&I uses these costs in computing your premium rates.

24

Chapter 8

If You Disagree With an L&I Decision

The Department of Labor & Industries makes many decisions that may affect your business, such as audit findings or actions on industrial insurance claims. You have the right to protest or appeal any decision and you must follow certain legal procedures to protect your rights. You may either protest/request a reconsideration or appeal. The information below provides general guidance. Every order issued by L&I should contain a notice of your appeal rights. Please be sure to follow the information on your order if you wish to preserve your right to appeal.

Protest/Reconsideration
If you disagree with a decision, you must send a letter to Labor & Industries protesting or requesting reconsideration of the ruling. Explain why you think it is unfair and what you think should be done. Please be specific. If L&I's decision is in the form of a Notice and Order of Assessment, you must submit your request within 30 days of the day you receive the Notice. For all other decisions of the department, you have 60 days in which to submit your requests. If you write us within the appropriate time period after receiving a legal Notice and Order, the law requires us to respond to your protest with another written decision. This may either change or reaffirm our earlier ruling.

25

Chapter 8
If you disagree with the second decision, you may appeal in writing to the Board of Industrial Insurance Appeals in Olympia.

Appeal
If you prefer, you may appeal our initial decision directly to the Board of Industrial Insurance Appeals without first writing us. But you must send your letter or appeal to the board within the specified time frames (30 days for an Assessment and 60 days for all other decisions) after receiving the legal order with which you disagree. The Board of Industrial Insurance Appeals is separate and independent from Labor & Industries. It is a three-member, quasi-judicial board that conducts hearings on workers' compensation issues that cannot be resolved to the satisfaction of you, your employee or Labor & Industries. The appeal can be lengthy and complex. For complete information, please write to the Board for a copy of its booklet, Your Right to Be Heard, at the following address: Board of Industrial Insurance Appeals PO Box 42401 Olympia WA 98504-2401 360-753-6823 Additional information on Firm appeals may be obtained at this L&I Web site: www.Lni.wa.gov/ClaimsIns/Insurance/ RatesRisk/Appeal/

26

Appendix A

Definition of an Employer
For purposes of industrial insurance coverage, an employer is defined as follows within RCW 51.08.070. "Employer" means any person, body of persons, corporate or otherwise, and the legal representatives of a deceased employer, all while engaged in this state in any work covered by the provisions of this title, by way of trade or business, or who contracts with one or more workers, the essence of which is the personal labor of such worker or workers. Or as an exception to the definition of employer, persons or entities are not employers when they contract or agree to remunerate the services performed by an individual who meets the tests set forth in subsections (1) through (6) of RCW 51.08.195 or the separate tests set forth in RCW 51.08.181 for work performed that requires registration under chapter 18.27 RCW or licensing under chapter 19.28 RCW. To refer to the RCWs noted above, go to www.Lni.wa.gov/LawRule. If you have any questions about whether you qualify as an employer for the purpose of industrial insurance coverage, refer to L&I's A Guide to Hiring Independent Contractors in Washington State on the Web at www.Lni.wa.gov/IPUB/101-063-000.pdf or contact L&I's Employer Services at 360-902-4817.

Definition of a Worker
For purposes of industrial insurance coverage, a worker is defined as follows within RCW 51.08.180. "Worker" means every person in this state who is engaged in the employment of an employer under this title, whether by way of manual labor or otherwise in the course of his or her employment; also every person in this state who is engaged in the employment of or who is working under an independent contract, the essence of which is his or her personal labor for an employer under this title, whether by way of manual labor or otherwise, in the course of his or her employment, or as an exception to the definition of worker, a person is not a worker if he or she meets the tests set forth in subsections (1) through (6) of RCW 51.08.195 or the separate tests set forth in RCW 51.08.181 for work performed that requires registration under chapter 18.27 RCW or licensing under chapter 19.28 RCW: PROVIDED, That a person is not a worker for the purpose of this title, with respect to his or her activities attendant to operating a truck which he or she owns, and which is leased to a common or contract carrier. To refer to the RCWs noted above, go to www.Lni.wa.gov/LawRule . If you have any questions about whether your employee is defined as a "worker" for the purpose of industrial insurance coverage, refer to L&I's A Guide to Hiring Independent Contractors in Washington State on the Web at www.Lni.wa.gov/IPUB/101-063-000.pdf or contact L&I's Employer Services at 360-902-4817.

27

Appendix B

Responsibility for Independent Contractors
All Businesses
If you enter into a contract with an independent contractor, you may be required to provide industrial insurance coverage during the period of the contract. You must cover the contractor if he or she is a worker as defined in the industrial insurance laws. That definition (see previous section of Appendix A) includes workers "... working under an independent contract, the essence of which is his or her personal labor." The legal question of whether an independent contractor should be considered a worker employed by the contracting party, for industrial insurance purposes, has been the subject of a number of court cases. RCW 51.08.195 gives an employer an alternative six-part test to determine if an independent contractor is exempt from mandatory coverage. This law has been adopted for both L&I and Employment Security, giving an employer an advantage in that both agencies will use the same six-part test to determine exemptions for independent contractors. The six-part test states that a person is exempt if: 1. He or she is free from control and direction over the performance of the services, AND 2. The service provided is outside the usual course of business OR it is performed outside all of the places of business of the hiring enterprise OR the hired individual is responsible, both under the contract and in fact, for the costs of the principal place of business from which the service is performed. 3. The individual is engaged in an independently established trade of the same nature as the contract, OR the individual has a principle place of business eligible for IRS business deduction, AND 4. The individual is responsible for filing a schedule of expense and income with the IRS for the business, AND 5. On the effective date of contract or within a reasonable period, has established required accounts with state agencies, AND 6. The individual maintains a separate set of books and records that reflect items of income and expense for the business. You are subject to penalties for not covering an independent contractor if, under the law, coverage is required.

Additional Responsibilities for Construction and Electrical Contractors
If you are a construction or electrical contractor, you must follow the six-part test above and apply a seventh part to determine whether an individual is exempt from mandatory coverage. (See RCW 51.08.181.) 7. The individual must have a valid contractor registration pursuant to chapter 18.27 RCW or an electrical contractor license pursuant to chapter 19.28 RCW.

28

Appendix B Chapter 8

Responsibility for a Subcontractor's Unpaid Premiums
You are legally responsible for payment of premiums due if someone under contract with you to perform a job fails to pay required industrial insurance premiums on his or her employees performing the work. You can protect yourself from liability by taking the following actions: 1. Get the contractor's and subcontractor's industrial insurance account numbers and contractor registration numbers when you award the contract. 2. Before accepting a contract or before making your final payment on a contract, you should review the contractor's industrial insurance status on the Internet at www.Lni.wa.gov/ClaimsIns/Insurance/Uninsured/. You can use this Web site to determine if your contractor or subcontractor has a current industrial insurance account. 3. You have a legal right to withhold from your payment the amount of premiums due if the contractor or subcontractor has failed to pay them. Send this amount to us with a letter of explanation, and the department will send you a written release from further liability. A contractor may be exempt from liability for his or her subcontractors. A contractor registered under Chapter 18.27 RCW or licensed under Chapter 19.28 RCW, referring to the building construction industry, shall not be responsible for any premiums upon the work of any subcontractor if: 1. The subcontractor currently is engaged in a business that is registered under Chapter 18.27 RCW or licensed under Chapter 19.28 RCW; 2. The subcontractor has a principal place of business which would be eligible for a business deduction for Internal Revenue Service tax purposes other than that furnished by the contractor for which the business has contracted to furnish services; 3. The subcontractor maintains a separate set of books or records that reflects all items of income and expenses of the business; 4. The subcontractor has contracted to perform: (a) The work of a contract as defined in 18.27.010 RCW; and (b) The work of installing wires or equipment to convey electric current or installing apparatus to be operated by such current as it pertains to the electrical industry as described in Chapter 19.28 RCW.

29

Appendix B
5. The subcontractor has an industrial insurance account in good standing with the department or is a self-insurer. For the purposes of this subsection, a contractor may consider a subcontractor's account to be in good standing if, within a year prior to letting the contract or master service agreement, and at least once a year thereafter, the contractor has verified with the department that the account is in good standing and the contractor has not received written notice from the department that the subcontractor's account status has changed. Acceptable documentation of verification includes a department document which includes an issued date or a dated printout of information from the department's internet Web site showing a subcontractor's good standing. The department shall develop an approach to provide contractors with verification of the date of inquiries validating that the subcontractor's account is in good standing.

Responsibility for Contract Entertainers
Under certain circumstances, you may be responsible for industrial insurance coverage for entertainers with whom you hold a contract. If you sign a contract with an entertainer for a specific engagement, and the person performs no other services, he or she is not considered your employee under industrial insurance law. If your contract is with the leader of a group acting as the employer of other group members, the leader is required to provide coverage for his or her employees. However, if the leader does not pay the required premiums for employee coverage, you can be held responsible for those premiums. You can protect yourself by checking to see whether the leader has registered with L&I and is current in his or her premium payments. Call L&I's Employer Services Section at 360-902-4817.

IMPORTANT NOTE:
Contractors should be aware that, under industrial insurance law (Chapter 51.12 RCW), it is unlawful for any county, city or town to issue a construction building permit to any person who has not submitted an estimate of payroll to L&I and paid the required premiums. If the person qualifies for self-insurance, he/she must show proof of self-insurance certification before a permit can be granted.

30

Appendix C

Certificate of Coverage

S

PLE AM

31

Appendix C

Workers' Compensation Rate Notice

SA

LE MP

32

Appendix C

Employer's Quarterly Report for Industrial Insurance

SA

LE MP

33

Appendix C

L&I Web Addresses


L&I's main Web site: www.Lni.wa.gov Web site for the Insurance Services Division of L&I: www.Lni.wa.gov/ClaimsIns Online text of Washington State Industrial Insurance Laws (Title 51): www.Lni.wa.gov/LawRule File quarterly reports online: www.QuarterlyReports.Lni.wa.gov Report Fraud: www.Fraud.Lni.wa.gov



Toll-free Numbers


Automated claims information: 1-800-831-5227 An automated telephone system that answers common claim-related information for injured workers, employers and medical providers. Office of Information and Assistance: 1-800-547-8367 Serves as a central point of contact in Labor & Industries. Customer service representatives answer general questions about workers' compensation, workplace safety and health and other L&I services. Safety and Health Information Line: 1-800-423-7233 Provides a menu of options callers can use to request safety and health rules, learn about "right to know" billing, obtain information on ergonomics, order posters and publications and more. To make a workplace-related safety and health complaint, please call the L&I office nearest you. Provider Line: 1-800-848-0811 Service providers involved in the care and treatment of injured workers use this number to obtain authorization for services and answers to billing questions. Report Fraud: 1-888-811-5974 Use this number to report contractor, employer, workers' compensation, or medical provider fraud.









34

Appendix C

Addresses and Telephone Numbers for Local L&I Offices
Region 1

Northwest Washington
Bellingham...............360-647-7300
1720 Ellis St., Suite 200 Bellingham, WA 98225-4647 729 100th St. SE Everett, WA 98208-3727

Region 4

Southwest Washington
Aberdeen ..................360-533-8200
415 W. Wishkah, Suite 1B Aberdeen, WA 98520-4315 900 Ocean Beach Hwy Longview, WA 98632-4013

Everett .......................425-290-1300 Mount Vernon ..........360-416-3000
525 E. College Way, Suite H Mount Vernon, WA 98273-5500

Longview ..................360-575-6900 Tumwater .................360-902-5799
7273 Linderson Way SW Tumwater, WA 98501-5414

Region 2

Vancouver ................360-896-2300
312 SE Stonemill Dr., Suite 120 Vancouver, WA 98684-3508

King County
Bellevue ...................425-990-1400
616 120th Ave. NE, Suite C201 Bellevue, WA 98005-3037 315 5th Ave. S., Suite 200 Seattle, WA 98104-2607 PO Box 69050 12806 Gateway Drive Tukwila, WA 98168-1050

Region 5

Central Washington
East Wenatchee ......509-886-6500
519 Grant Road East Wenatchee, WA 98802-5459 4310 W. 24th Ave. Kennewick, WA 99338

Seattle.......................206-515-2800 Tukwila .....................206-835-1000

Kennewick ...............509-735-0100 Moses Lake..............509-764-6900
3001 W. Broadway Ave. Moses Lake, WA 98837-2907 15 W. Yakima Ave., Suite 100 Yakima, WA 98902-3480

Region 3

Pierce County/Peninsula
Bremerton ................360-415-4000
500 Pacific Ave., Suite 400 Bremerton, WA 98337-1943

Yakima ......................509-454-3700

Port Angeles ............360-417-2700
1605 E. Front St., Suite C Port Angeles, WA 98362-4628 950 Broadway, Suite 200 Tacoma, WA 98402-4453

Region 6

Eastern Washington
Colville......................509-684-7417
298 S. Main, Suite 203 Colville, WA 99114-2416

Tacoma .....................253-596-3800

Pullman.....................509-334-5296
PO Box 847 1250 Bishop Blvd. SE, Suite G Pullman, WA 99163-0847 901 N. Monroe St., Suite 100 Spokane, WA 98201-2149

Spokane....................509-324-2600 35

Other formats for persons with disabilities are available on request. Call 1-800-547-8367. TDD users, call 360-902-5797. L&I is an equal opportunity employer. PUBLICATION F101-002-000 [05-2009]